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Study: Poor roads cost Texans $23 billion a year

The study found that 18 percent of the state's major urban roads were in poor condition, with San Antonio having the worst with 33 percent with pavements in poor condition. Another 27 percent of the state's major urban road surfaces were in mediocre shape.

The Associated Press

10/3/2012

DALLAS  — A nonprofit highway industry group says its study found decaying Texas roads are costing motorists more than $23 billion a year.

TRIP is sponsored by insurance companies, highway and transit engineers and builders and other groups. The Washington, D.C.-based group says decaying roads were hitting Houston-area motorists hardest in the pocketbook — to the tune of almost $1,900 in 2011.

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The study found that 18 percent of the state's major urban roads were in poor condition, with San Antonio having the worst with 33 percent with pavements in poor condition. Another 27 percent of the state's major urban road surfaces were in mediocre shape.

Traffic congestion was delaying Houston-area commuters by 57 hours at a cost of almost $1,200.

Kevin Jones of The Trucker staff can be reached for comment at kevinj@thetrucker.com.

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