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Fewer shippers unconcerned about CSA scores, says TCP research

With the knowledge that mandated electronic logs are coming, the number of carriers which have done nothing continues to decline from 33 percent in May 2012 to 18 percent in August 2013. (The Trucker file photo)

The Trucker News Services

10/15/2013

WINDSOR, Colo. — While carriers may be focusing on safety, fewer shippers are unconcerned about CSA scores, the third-quarter Transport Capital Partners truck industry survey revealed.

The survey also showed that the use of electronic logging devices continues to grow and increasingly truck speeds are controlled.

The number of shippers not concerned by carrier CSA scores has increased from 15 percent to 22 percent, approximately the same numbers as in May 2012.

It is troubling that the number of shippers not concerned by CSA scores significantly outweighs the number of shippers who are concerned — 22 percent to 16 percent.

“We are at a loss to explain the increase in shippers not concerned. One possible explanation is that shippers simply do not use CSA scores as a determinant in choosing a carrier,” TCP Partner Richard Mikes said.

It is likely that many shippers do not believe CSA scores reflect the actual safety of a carrier, Mikes said.

More smaller carriers than larger carriers reported that their shippers are not concerned about CSA scores — 27 percent vs. 20 percent.

For the first time, the Business Expectations Survey asked carriers their current truck speed limit.

Operating at posted speed limits is an essential aspect of truck and driver safety and it is also very important for managing fuel costs, Mikes noted.  

Nearly half of carriers (46 percent) indicated their speed limit was set at 65 mph. Thirty-one percent indicated it was set at 63 mph. Almost twice as many smaller carriers than larger carriers were setting speed limits at 68 mph (21 percent vs. 11 percent).

“Many carriers that use e-logs tell us driver acceptance is good, Hours of Service compliance is better, and CSA scores have improved since full implementation,” Steven Dutro, TCP partner, said.

With the knowledge that mandated electronic logs are coming, the number of carriers which have done nothing continues to decline from 33 percent in May 2012 to 18 percent in August 2013. The number of carriers committed to using e-logs is now at 57 percent. 

Larger carriers are far more committed to e-logs than smaller carriers, 71 percent vs. 27 percent.

This may result from larger carriers having the financial resources to fund, train, and manage compliance and dispatch, while smaller carriers continue to postpone the expense, Dutro said.

The Trucker staff can be reached to comment on this article at editor@thetrucker.com.

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