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Heavy snow, thunderstorms moving into Midwest

A foot of snow had fallen in western South Dakota's scenic Black Hills by early Friday, thanks to a storm gaining strength as it slowly moves east from Colorado and Wyoming. Blizzard conditions were expected in the area, with as much as 3 feet of snow and wind gusts of between 50 and 70 mph. (The Trucker file photo)

The Associated Press

10/4/2013

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Powerful storms crawled into the Midwest on Friday, dumping heavy snow in South Dakota, spawning a tornado in Nebraska and threatening dangerous thunderstorms from Oklahoma to Wisconsin.

A foot of snow had fallen in western South Dakota's scenic Black Hills by early Friday, thanks to a storm gaining strength as it slowly moves east from Colorado and Wyoming. Blizzard conditions were expected in the area, with as much as 3 feet of snow and wind gusts of between 50 and 70 mph.

Although early October snowfalls aren't unusual in the Black Hills, a storm of this magnitude happens only once every decade or two on the plains, National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Trimarchi said.

"I couldn't say when the last time we've had one like this. It's been quite a while," Trimarchi said.

Large hail and powerful winds were forecast to hit northwest Oklahoma later Friday, while heavy rain was expected across the region into Wisconsin, where warnings were issued for dense fog.

In Nebraska, a tornado that touched down Thursday night damaged homes and businesses in several communities, knocked out power and toppled trees. But no injuries have been reported.

Motorists were being advised to stay off the roads in western South Dakota, where the western 30 miles of Interstate 90 was closed between Sturgis and the Wyoming border. Officials said the road will remain closed until storm conditions improve and crews are able to clear the highway.

The Department of Transportation also advised no travel on some other roadways in the region.

Snow was still falling across northern Colorado early Friday, though no major problems have been reported. Forecasters expect snow to the heaviest in the higher mountains, while the Denver metropolitan area was reporting rain turning into snow.

"It's mainly wet, with a few icy roads in the mountains," Joe Tucker, spokesman for the Colorado Department of Transportation, said Friday morning.

"This isn't unusual for Colorado this time of year," said Jim Kalina of the National Weather Service in Boulder, Colo., where as many as 8 inches of snow is forecast.


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