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Revised 2011 fatality rate by occupation shows trucking still very dangerous

The largest net increase in fatal work injuries among occupations involved drivers of tractor-trailers or other heavy trucks, putting the total fatalities for this occupation at 670, compared with 656 previously for 2011, a 3 percent increase.

The Trucker Staff

4/25/2013

Trucking is still a highly dangerous industry, according to revisions of 2011 fatal work statistics released today by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The largest net increase in fatal work injuries among occupations involved drivers of tractor-trailers or other heavy trucks, putting the total fatalities for this occupation at 670, compared with 656 previously for 2011, a 3 percent increase.

Also, roadway accidents were higher by 28 cases or up 3 percent, bringing the 2011 total fatal, work-related roadway incidents to 1,103, BLS reported.

The revisions were made to the 2011 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries counts.

The Bureau releases preliminary fatalities by occupation and adds subsequent numbers from states as they become available.

Overall, 21 states revised their counts upward as a result of the updating process, the Bureau noted in a news release.

The final count for all fatal work injuries in the U.S. in 2011 was 4,693, up from the preliminary count of 4,609 reported in September 2012.

The final 2011 total was the third-lowest annual total since the census was first conducted in 1992, and the published fatal injury rate for 2011 equals the lowest rate reported by the program since the conversion to hours-based rates in 2006.

The Trucker staff can be reached to comment on this article at editor@thetrucker.com.

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JB Hunt