Seven Oaks


Sponsored By:

   The Nation  |  Business  |  Equipment  |  Features


OOIDA: Bridge collapse why truck weight limits shouldn't be raised

“The recent bridge collapse is a classic example of how the stability of our nation’s highways and bridges is already compromised,” said Todd Spencer, OOIDA executive vice-president.

The Trucker News Services

5/30/2013

GRAIN VALLEY, Mo. – While attending a public input session Wednesday conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation, professional truckers gave reasons why commercial truck sizes and weight limits should not be raised from current levels, according to the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association.

OOIDA is concerned that proposals to raise weight and size restrictions would compromise highway safety and infrastructure.

“The recent bridge collapse is a classic example of how the stability of our nation’s highways and bridges is already compromised,” said Todd Spencer, OOIDA executive vice-president. “Adding more weight to the equation is the last thing we need when states are already struggling to come up with funding for maintenance.”

The input session was held to fulfill requirements of the highway bill passed by Congress which tells the DOT to conduct a Comprehensive Truck Size and Weight Limits Study. The study will review impacts like safety and infrastructure, cost and effectiveness and other results if federal truck size and weight limits were to be increased.

“Today’s session brought out complexities that have been overlooked or oversimplified,” said Spencer. “Proponents of loosening restrictions would have everyone looking past parking, stopping distance and lack of driver training. It’s no minor change to raise weight limits as they would like everyone to believe.”

Those who were not able to attend today’s session online or in person are invited to submit comments directly to CTSWStudy@dot.gov. In addition, a transcript of the presentations and a summary of the discussions will be available on the Federal Highway Administration Office of Freight Management and Operations website at: http://www.ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/sw/map21tswstudy/index.htm.

OOIDA is the largest national trade association representing the interests of small-business trucking professionals and professional truck drivers. The Association currently has more than 150,000 members nationwide. OOIDA was established in 1973 and is headquartered in the greater Kansas City, Mo., area.

The Trucker staff can be reached to comment on this article at editor@thetrucker.com.

Find more news and analysis from The Trucker, and share your thoughts, on Facebook.

Celadon