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Trucking companies, environmental groups seek to stop $500 million rail yard near L.A. Port

The trucking companies, California Cartage, Los Angeles Grain Terminal, San Pedro Forklift, Three Rivers Trucking and Fast Lane Transportation, also say the approval is in violation of the California Environmental Quality Act, while the NRDC says federal civil rights laws have been violated because the environmental impact will fall on low-income, minority communities bordering the area.

The Trucker News Services

6/10/2013

The City of Los Angeles and the Port of L.A. are being assailed from trucking companies, an environmental group, the City of Long Beach and a school district over the city’s approval of a $500 million rail yard near the Port.

Five trucking companies, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach United School District filed lawsuits last week challenging the 153-acre facility that will border homes, schools and parks and force the trucking companies off land they own.

The carriers say their forced relocation under eminent domain will result in job losses numbering in the thousands.

The approval was given by the City of L.A. to Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway so that the Southern California International Gateway project can move cargo to and from the nearby Port by rail.

The trucking companies, California Cartage, Los Angeles Grain Terminal, San Pedro Forklift, Three Rivers Trucking and Fast Lane Transportation, also say the approval is in violation of the California Environmental Quality Act, while the NRDC says federal civil rights laws have been violated because the environmental impact will fall on low-income, minority communities bordering the area.

The freight yard could handle 2.8 million 20-foot shipping containers a year by 2035 and 8,200 trucks a day it’s estimated.

Railroad and harbor officials say the facility will be the “greenest” of its kind and use low-emission diesel trucks, cranes, yard hostlers and locomotives, according to the L.A. Times.

Proponents also claim that the yard will eliminated more than 1 million truck trips a year on the 710 Freeway while a landscaped berm and sound walls will keep out noise and other pollution.

The Trucker staff can be reached to comment on this article at editor@thetrucker.com.

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