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I-235 through OKC to close for weekend

The stretch of I-235 north of Oklahoma City, which carries about 100,000 vehicles daily between I-235 and the Broadway Extension, will be closed from 9 p.m. Saturday to 5 a.m. Monday.

The Associated Press

9/7/2013

OKLAHOMA CITY — Oklahoma highway officials will close a portion of Interstate 235 north of downtown Oklahoma City this weekend so crews can remove a bridge that is in the way of a major construction project of the roadway linking the capital city to its northern suburbs.

The work could snarl traffic for football fans traveling after Saturday's game between Oklahoma and West Virginia. The stretch of road, which carries about 100,000 vehicles daily between I-235 and the Broadway Extension, will be closed from 9 p.m. Saturday to 5 a.m. Monday.

"As part of the southwest quadrant of the Broadway Extension project, which is the south ramp from I-44 to southbound 235, we are having to take out the bridge over 50th Street which has been closed actually due to a hit on a ramp for the last few months," Terri Angier, a spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Highway Department, told The Oklahoman newspaper (http://bit.ly/1aof5U0 ).

Road crews are widening I-235 near its intersection with I-44. The interstate currently is at least three lanes wide near downtown and the Broadway Extension is three lanes or wider north of I-44, but the road is constricted where 50th Street, a railroad and the 50th Street onramp converge.

"The name of the game this weekend is plan ahead," Angier said.

Highway officials suggest avoiding the area altogether by taking I-35 or the Lake Hefner Parkway, which run parallel to I-235 and the Broadway Extension. Traffic that does enter I-235 will be forced to exit at 36th Street and take surface streets to rejoin I-44 or another controlled-access highway.

Workers have already finished a new ramp from southbound Broadway Extension to I-44 westbound and a current $9 million digging and demolition project is part of a construction plan that could last for seven or eight years.

The state plans to eventually add flyover ramps and improve frontage roads at the intersection.

The Trucker staff can be reached to comment on this article at editor@thetrucker.com.

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