Monday, January 15, 2018

DTNA: Navistar 'fluid' test run unrealistic, 'apples and oranges' comparison


Friday, July 23, 2010
by DOROTHY COX

“A statement by JPMorgan issued just yesterday [July 21] in an investor guidance statement picked up on public websites effectively refutes Navistar inferences from the study. In it, JPMorgan clearly articulates ‘the apples-and-oranges flaw in the comparison and questions Navistar’s intent in commissioning the study.’ We agree with that statement,” they said.
“A statement by JPMorgan issued just yesterday [July 21] in an investor guidance statement picked up on public websites effectively refutes Navistar inferences from the study. In it, JPMorgan clearly articulates ‘the apples-and-oranges flaw in the comparison and questions Navistar’s intent in commissioning the study.’ We agree with that statement,” they said.

“It is neither appropriate nor credible to compare the 12.4L MaxxForce ‘mystery’ engine with proven technology available in the market,” said Daimler Trucks North America in response to Navistar’s “fluid efficiency” test findings (click here to read story).

DTNA noted a statement by JPMorgan commenting on the “apples and oranges” nature of comparing different sized engines.

“A statement by JPMorgan issued just yesterday [July 21] in an investor guidance statement picked up on public websites effectively refutes Navistar inferences from the study. In it, JPMorgan clearly articulates ‘the apples-and-oranges flaw in the comparison and questions Navistar’s intent in commissioning the study.’ We agree with that statement,” they said.

DTNA went on to elaborate on its own testing methods: “We run stringent fuel economy tests at Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA) which are both accurate and substantiated,” said Elmar Boeckenhoff, senior vice president, engineering and technology for DTNA. “We test back-to-back componentry, which is comparable from both a truck and an engine perspective. Ratings, displacements, truck configuration and more are matched to achieve valid results. The combination chosen by our competitor does not comply with these basic premises for proper engineering work and thus doesn't provide a trustworthy result.”

Further, Boeckenhoff said the test run was too short to give realistic results.

“The 440-mile test run by our competitor is not appropriate for testing modern EPA 2010-compliant trucks. Running such a short distance test tampers with the outcome by calibrating regeneration intervals to occur immediately before and immediately after the test is completed.

“DTNA's BlueTec Detroit Diesel engines regenerate after thousands of miles, not hundreds of miles. The longer the test, the more realistic the results and the closer they are to what a customer would experience in real-world operations.

“DTNA has built more than 3,000 EPA 2010-compliant Cascadias with DD15 engines and more than 2,000 full production vehicles are currently running every day in customer fleets. Numerous customers running real life tests had completely different results and they have found Freightliner to be the best solution.

“In order to get a truly accurate and reliable comparison between vehicles, the use of comparable products with equivalent drivetrain components is a must. We're eagerly anticipating acquiring an EPA 2010 certified series production 12.4L MaxxForce engine in order to run our own comparison study.

“In the end,” Boeckenhoff said, “customers have voted loud and clear for Daimler's BlueTec solution. Daimler Trucks North America has logged more than 25,000 EPA 2010 SCR-equipped orders.”

Dorothy Cox of The Trucker staff may be contacted to comment at dlcox@thetrucker.com.

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