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CDL-A High End Automobile Hauling Jobs in Dothan, AL – $100-210K

High end freight
Reliable Carriers Inc.
Reliable Carriers Inc.
A Leader Among Auto Transport Companies
Reliable Carriers began 50+ years ago with a desire to transport cars and trucks to any with an unparalleled level of care and an untouchable degree of professionalism. Today, Reliable Carriers Inc. is the country’s largest enclosed auto transport company.
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CDL-A Company Drivers in Dothan, AL

Welcome to the world of high-end hauling!

If you don’t want to be just another number but recognized for your personal efforts, we would like to discuss available driving opportunities and positions with Reliable Carriers.

 

Driver Benefits

  • Automobile & High End Commodities Hauling
  • Industry leading pay: Solos $100k | Teams $210k
  • Paid holidays, personal days/vacation pay
  • Flexible home time
  • Profit sharing
  • Health, Dental, Vision and Life insurance
  • Paid orientation

 

Requirements

  • Class A CDL & Clean MVR
  • Three years OTR
  • Previous auto transport, HHG, HVP carrier driving or similar specialized experience.
  • Verifiable experience in driver safety and cargo securement

Along with the job benefits already mentioned for truck driving jobs, there are several other appealing opportunities for truckers residing in Dothan. When it comes to truck driver jobs, Massachusetts offers many industries in which a driver can specialize as well as a large number of companies and carriers. Many Massachusetts trucking jobs are regional, with loads hauled in-state, throughout New England and to New York, and most products involve technology.

or call (855) 885-3234

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with Reliable Carriers Inc.

Additional Job Resources about this job

Company Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is Company Driver?

Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Lease-Purchase Drivers

The information below provides insight into how being a Lease-Purchase driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is a Lease-Purchase Driver?

Lease-Purchase drivers (LPDs) are drivers who often have experience driving for a carrier or company but are interested in taking a step toward greater independence and eventually taking outright ownership of their equipment. Lease Purchase drivers have more control over work hours, jobs accepted, and routes driven than Company Drivers, but not as much control as Owner-Operators.

Carriers frequently offer lease purchase options to drivers. Under a Lease-Purchase arrangement, the carrier likely owns the truck but enters into an agreement with the driver in which the truck is leased to the driver for a fixed or variable fee (as specified in the least agreement). The driver pays the leasing fee, a portion of which goes to pay down the “principal” and a portion goes to an agreed upon interest rate. If the driver remains with the lease long enough, the full original value of the truck will be paid off, and the driver assumes ownership of the truck.

A driver exploring lease-purchase arrangement should research various carriers or company-specific information. They should compare the pros and cons of each, look closely at those that appear to best match their level of acceptable risk, their abilities to operate a business, their forecasted expenses, and their lifestyle.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Lease-Purchase Drivers?

Lease-Purchase drivers will find that a blend of traits needed of Company Drivers and Owner Operators will serve them well as they take a step toward self-employment. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, lease-purchase drivers are also faced with the need for business savvy, accounting and bookkeeping knowledge, experience with taxes, and an ability to remain up to date with current and forecast trends in the freight transport industries.

For additional information about Lease-Purchase Drivers, including what is a Lease-Purchase Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Lease-Purchase Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Owner Operators

The information below provides insight into how working as an Owner Operator (also referred to as an Independent Contractor) may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is an Owner Operator?

At its most basic level, an owner-operator (OO) is exactly as it sounds — a driver who owns the truck he or she operates as an independent business. For many truck drivers, becoming an OO means you have reached the pinnacle of the truck driving industry. You own, or have financed, the costs of your own truck in your own name. You decide who you will contract with, when you will contract, where you will drive, and the cargo you are willing to carry.

An OO is a "free and clear" small business owner. Likewise, those searching for freight shipment often prefer to deal with OOs and will pay more when the opportunity is exists. The fact that an OO, by definition, means the truck's owner and driver are one in the same removes the financial burden of a carrier or company hiring, training and maintaining extra drivers when demand sinks to normal or below normal levels.

What personal characteristics best serve Owner Operators?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, an OO needs to have the knowledge and ability to operate within the industry and maintain mutually-beneficial relationships with clients. These client relationships must be developed to a level beyond that of any other type of driver. As an OO, you have reached the top of the heap when it comes to truck driving. There are no shortcuts, and through experience, you need to know how to react in virtually all situations ranging from personal interactions to truck repairs to working with your accountant if you are subject to an audit.

For additional information about Owner Operators, including what is a Owner Operator, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Owner Operators, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Team Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Team Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is a Team Driver?

A team driver is a driver operating with a partner who shares driving duties and other tasks with the other partner. Delivery is much faster than utilizing a single driver, as Hours of Service regulations can be met for one driver while the other is resting. Team drivers often consist of spouses driving together or partners in an owner-operator situation. Likewise, an owner-operator may hire on another driver for the sole purpose of serving as part of a two-man team.

In some cases, a team can be formed by two individuals who may own a truck together or when one works for the other driver. But more frequently team drivers are the result of carrier or company programs that pair up drivers to provide the benefits a team arrangement offers. Of course, these teams must be carefully selected and monitored. People do not get along for a variety of reasons. A team that gets along well, communicates, and has similar goals and expectations of the job is going to be far more efficient and productive than a team that does not like driving together.

What personal characteristics are need for Team Drivers?

There is nothing as important to team driving as the personal relationships built between the partners. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Team Driver must be able to work day-in and day-out with a partner. You’ll likely recognize that a team driving arrangement complicates and trumps any other issue you may run into in terms of personal characteristics.

For additional information about Team Drivers, including what is a Team Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Team Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is automobile hauling equipment?

Depending on the number of vehicles be carried, automobile hauling equipment may include a flatbed trailer or, more often, an open trailer with two “stacked decks” capable of hauling a dozen or more vehicles. After the lower deck of vehicles is unloaded by driving them down a ramp (a part of the trailer), the top deck is most often lowered using hydraulics until its ramps a capable of connecting the lower ramps so the remaining vehicles can be unloaded.

What are the requirements to drive automobile hauling equipment?

As will any type of specialized trailer, the driver needs to be trained in the challenges needed to haul automobile trailers. Likewise, driver must be fully trained in the operation of the equipment, including loading, securing, and offloading vehicles. Likewise, drivers pulling a load of vehicles may carry cargo worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. Drivers must take special care to ensure not only safety in the form of prevention of accidents but the safety of cargo as well.

What endorsements are necessary to hauls vehicles?

All automobile haulers must hold a CDL for the type of truck being driven (Class A, B, and/or C). In some cases, an (H), hazardous materials endorsement may be needed (particularly if the vehicles hauled have gas or other liquids pre-filled. Although an (N), Tanker, endorsement isn’t necessary, drivers holding (X), Hazardous Materials/Tankers are also eligible to haul vehicles.

For more information about Car Hauling (Automobile Hauling), including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Local Routes are shorter and cover a smaller (usually local) geographic area. Local Route drivers are home every night and have a regular daily route including several stops to offload cargo. Companies servicing restaurants, grocery stores, convenience stores, and high-volume retail outlets are frequently included in a local route on a daily or semi-regular basis.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.