CDL A Driver - Dedicated Regional Livestock - $73,000 Annually! - Hogan

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    Hogan is one of the largest, fastest growing, and most respected transportation service providers in the US.
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    Now Hiring CDL-A Drivers for Dedicated Regional Runs – Livestock

    Call Today: 866-507-9521

    Hogan offers our Dedicated CDL-A Truck Drivers:

      • $4,000 Sign on Bonus for experienced drivers
      • Average Annual pay of $73,000
      • Home Most Nights
      • Home Weekends
      • Set schedule for the week known in advance
      • Newer Equipment
      • Vacation and Holiday Pay
      • Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, 401(k)

    Hogan Requires:

      • Valid Class A CDL
      • 1 year of recent tractor-trailer experience
      • 6 months of specialty experience: Tanker, Logging, Flatbed, or Livestock

    Hogan is one of the most trusted names in full-sized trucking with over 100 years of experience on the road. We are adding more Dedicated routes for Class A CDL truck drivers seeking more balance between home time and time on the road. We also have Owner Operator and recent CDL-A Graduate opportunities. Whatever your route choice, we’ve got you covered because when you succeed, we succeed.

    To find the route that fits you best, call now and speak with a Recruiter at 866-507-9521. Know where your next mile is coming from.

    CARGRUSS

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    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is livestock truck driving?

    As the name implies, livestock truck drivers are those who pull trailers of live animals between locations. Livestock can include cattle, goats, chicken, or other farm animals — even chickens. Also, some drivers working for fish farms or state game and fish agencies may haul tanks of fish, also a form of livestock, to stock lakes or ponds where the fish are catchable or grow into a marketable size and weight.

    What characteristics do livestock truck drivers need?

    The most important difference between drivers of other equipment carry other types of cargo and livestock drivers is the need to be skilled working around animals. Animals are unpredictable and present an “off road” safety concerns for both drivers and others handling them. Quality assurance programs are often required for livestock drivers under state regulations. To ensure the quality assurance standards are met, drivers need to have physical strength, endurance, quick to react, and able to work in adverse weather conditions.

    Livestock drivers should be prepared to spend up to 25% of their working hours outside of the truck cab for duties related to caring for livestock and cleaning and sanitizing equipment. Attention to detail is important as livestock owners are very particular when it comes to who they allow to haul their livelihood to market and the equipment used to haul it. Livestock haulers also need to be familiar with animal welfare regulations on the states and communities the drive.

    What endorsements do livestock truck drivers need?

    A Class A license is normally the only requirement of a livestock driver.

    For more information about Livestock Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Dedicated Routes are most often assigned to specific drivers who drive the specifically assigned routes and no others. Dedicated route drivers are often regional or local and have more opportunities for home time. They are also frequently reserved for drivers who may find OTR routes more difficult.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.