TheTrucker.com

CDL-A Company Truck Driver & Lease Purchase Jobs in Fort Collins, CO

Sign-On Bonus Available
Riverside Transport Inc.

CDL-A Company Truck Drivers and Lease Purchase Truck Drivers in Fort Collins, CO

We strive to be a top employer, provide superior service to our customers, and earn corporate respect from our competitors.

We welcome drivers who are looking for successful paths to being their own boss, owning their own truck, having consistent pay and benefits, regular home time, and a family work atmosphere that puts people before profits.

Looking for Company Drivers in Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas and Utah.

Riverside Transport was founded in the fall of 1993 with 10 Owner Operators and 20 trailers. With over 27 years of work within the trucking industry, we have kept our family values while growing to a fleet of more than 900 tractors and 4,200 trailers. We have operational terminals equipped with maintenance repair shops onsite in Kansas City, KS, Owensboro, KY & Muskogee, OK.

Call Riverside Transport Now at 866-983-5056

Dry Van Truck Driver Compensation & Benefits:

  • Earn over $90,000 Per Year!!
  • $0.60-$0.62/mile based on experience for all loaded and empty miles
  • $1,750 Sign-On Bonus for W2 and $3,800 Sign-On Bonus for 1099
  • $5,000 accelerator sign on bonus paid quarterly
  • $500 Orientation Pay
  • $1000 Weekly Guarantee – Must be in good service standing. Provides security in the event of weather or breakdown.
  • Health, Vision, Dental and 401K for W2 – Third Party Options for 1099 Benefits
  • 30:1 Dispatcher ratio – easily reach your driver manager!
  • Contracted freight — don’t wait on brokers to plan you.
  • Regional Running – You don’t have to go far from home to make your miles.
  • Updated Equipment – RTI's updated equipment base means you will spend less time in the shop.

Truck Driver Qualifications:

  • 22 Years of Age
  • Class A CDL
  • 12 Months of Class A Experience
  • No More than 3 Moving Violations in 3 Years

Beyond the many job benefits previously mentioned above for truck driving jobs, there are several other appealing opportunities for truckers living in Fort Collins. Colorado’s position as a state with natural resources, livestock, high tech manufacturing, and military-industrial products provides ongoing and new opportunities for many truck drivers.


Riverside Transport Inc.
Successfully Connecting Drivers with Businesses
Riverside Transport was founded in the fall of 1993 with 10 Owner Operators and 20 trailers. With over 27 years of work within the trucking industry, we have kept our family values while growing to a fleet of more than 900 tractors and 4,200 trailers.
More info about this Carrier

or call (866) 983-5056

See all Jobs Opportunities
with Riverside Transport Inc.

Additional Job Resources about this job

Company Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is Company Driver?

Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Lease-Purchase Drivers

The information below provides insight into how being a Lease-Purchase driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is a Lease-Purchase Driver?

Lease-Purchase drivers (LPDs) are drivers who often have experience driving for a carrier or company but are interested in taking a step toward greater independence and eventually taking outright ownership of their equipment. Lease Purchase drivers have more control over work hours, jobs accepted, and routes driven than Company Drivers, but not as much control as Owner-Operators.

Carriers frequently offer lease purchase options to drivers. Under a Lease-Purchase arrangement, the carrier likely owns the truck but enters into an agreement with the driver in which the truck is leased to the driver for a fixed or variable fee (as specified in the least agreement). The driver pays the leasing fee, a portion of which goes to pay down the “principal” and a portion goes to an agreed upon interest rate. If the driver remains with the lease long enough, the full original value of the truck will be paid off, and the driver assumes ownership of the truck.

A driver exploring lease-purchase arrangement should research various carriers or company-specific information. They should compare the pros and cons of each, look closely at those that appear to best match their level of acceptable risk, their abilities to operate a business, their forecasted expenses, and their lifestyle.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Lease-Purchase Drivers?

Lease-Purchase drivers will find that a blend of traits needed of Company Drivers and Owner Operators will serve them well as they take a step toward self-employment. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, lease-purchase drivers are also faced with the need for business savvy, accounting and bookkeeping knowledge, experience with taxes, and an ability to remain up to date with current and forecast trends in the freight transport industries.

For additional information about Lease-Purchase Drivers, including what is a Lease-Purchase Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Lease-Purchase Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is Dry Van hauling?

Dry vans are likely the most basic type of trailer in the industry and the type beginning drivers are likely haul upon gaining their first jobs. A dry van is normally a 53-foot box-like trailers loaded with non-perishable good (think of the historical term of “dry goods store,” and the type of products they sold).

What are requirements necessary to haul dry van equipment?

Typically, dry vans can be hauled by anyone holding the appropriate classification of CDL.

What endorsements are need for dry van hauling?

If the cargo is considered hazardous or includes hazardous materials, an (H), Hazardous Materials, or (X), Hazardous Materials/Tanker endorsement is needed.

For more information about Dry Van Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Dedicated Routes are most often assigned to specific drivers who drive the specifically assigned routes and no others. Dedicated route drivers are often regional or local and have more opportunities for home time. They are also frequently reserved for drivers who may find OTR routes more difficult.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.