TheTrucker.com

PODS Dedicated Owner Operator CDL A

Getting you home to your family.
NFI
  • $5,000 Lease Incentive!
  • Annual Average Settlements: $170K – $180K+
  • Consistent Miles
  • $1.20 Per Mile – “All Miles” Plus FSC
  • Gross Weekly Average $4,000-$5,000
  • All Dedicated Lanes – 100% Pre Planned
  • Direct Deposit Every Friday
  • Dedicated carrier for PODS Moving and Storage
  • Operating in all 48 States plus Canada
  • Flatbed with no chains, no tarps and straps only
  • No Previous Flatbed Experience Required
  • Out 3 Weeks, Home 3 Days -OR- Out 4 Weeks, Home 4 Days
  • No home or residential deliveries
  • NFI Maintenance/Tire Program
  • Fuel Discount Network
  • Plate Program
  • Insurance available to Protect your company
  • Toll Transponder Provided, No out of pocket expense for tolls
  • Please contact Kyle at 888-991-4488

    PARTNERING WITH NFI

    At NFI “Partnerships Matter”. We provide our independent contractors with dedicated opportunities that make for profitable business. As a small business you have two numbers that matter to your business most- your gross revenue, and your expenses. The spread between those numbers is what the success of your business hinges upon. At NFI, our program is designed to provide owner operators and small fleet owners with consistent profits needed for success.

    As one of our 6 core values, NFI puts safety at the center of every operation. Owner Operators and Fleet Owners that partner with NFI Industries are expected to be safety-minded professionals, with a steadfast commitment to providing the best possible service to NFI and its customers. Drivers who operate equipment contracted to NFI must meet the same qualifications as NFI’s own company drivers.

    NFI basic driver qualifications include:

  • Minimum 22 years of age
  • Class A CDL from your state of residence
  • One (1) year of verifiable Class A commercial driving experience in a similar type/size of vehicle.


    NFI
    Getting you home to your family
    NFI has opportunities for Company Drivers, Owner-Operators, Independent Contractors, and Power-Only MC’s within our Dedicated Fleet, Drayage, and Truckload networks. Choose from several driver career paths and see where NFI can take you.
    More info about this Carrier

    or call (888) 991-4488

    See all Jobs Opportunities
    with NFI

    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Owner Operators

    The information below provides insight into how working as an Owner Operator (also referred to as an Independent Contractor) may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is an Owner Operator?

    At its most basic level, an owner-operator (OO) is exactly as it sounds — a driver who owns the truck he or she operates as an independent business. For many truck drivers, becoming an OO means you have reached the pinnacle of the truck driving industry. You own, or have financed, the costs of your own truck in your own name. You decide who you will contract with, when you will contract, where you will drive, and the cargo you are willing to carry.

    An OO is a "free and clear" small business owner. Likewise, those searching for freight shipment often prefer to deal with OOs and will pay more when the opportunity is exists. The fact that an OO, by definition, means the truck's owner and driver are one in the same removes the financial burden of a carrier or company hiring, training and maintaining extra drivers when demand sinks to normal or below normal levels.

    What personal characteristics best serve Owner Operators?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, an OO needs to have the knowledge and ability to operate within the industry and maintain mutually-beneficial relationships with clients. These client relationships must be developed to a level beyond that of any other type of driver. As an OO, you have reached the top of the heap when it comes to truck driving. There are no shortcuts, and through experience, you need to know how to react in virtually all situations ranging from personal interactions to truck repairs to working with your accountant if you are subject to an audit.

    For additional information about Owner Operators, including what is a Owner Operator, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Owner Operators, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is flatbed hauling equipment?

    Flatbed trailers are essentially exactly what the name implies — a base of steel or similar material mounted on a frame with axles and wheels. Flat beds often haul oversized load that cannot fit in an enclosed trailer.

    What are driver requirements for hauling flatbed equipment?

    Aside from the appropriate CDL, drivers of flatbed equipment need to be adept at securing cargo with tarps, “come-a-longs,” chains, strapping, or other types of devices. Before leaving the location of loading, drivers must make sure the cargo is securely held on the trailer and unable to move in any direction during events up to and including collisions, jackknifing, or to the extent possible, rollovers. Securing cargo on flatbed trailers is not a one-time check-and-go responsibility and must be rechecked and adjusted as needed.

    Another important point of flatbed hauling concerns oversized loads. If cargo is wider or taller than a trailer would otherwise carry, the trailer must include large notations indicating “Oversized Load.” In some cases, oversized loads will be accompanied by pilot vehicles who alert the truck drivers of potentially dangerous barriers ahead and often pull into the left lane to prevent other vehicles from passing until safe.

    What endorsements are needed for flatbed hauling?

    Endorsements for flatbed hauling depend on the type of cargo secured to the trailer. In cases where hazardous materials are being hauled, an (H) or (X) endorsement is needed. Also, if a tank of liquid, hazardous or not, is placed on a flatbed, for hauling purposes the trailer becomes a tanker. In such cases, it is best to hold endorsements for (N) Tankers, (H) Hazardous Materials, and/or (X) Hazardous Materials/Tanker combinations.

    For more information about Flatbed Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.