CDL-A Dry Van Truck Driver

This job opportunity is open | Updated June 17, 2021 at 10:05 pm

$1,250 Quarterly Safety Bonus
Western Express
Western Express
Our Drivers Keep America Rolling
Western Express, Inc. is an asset-based truckload carrier headquartered in Nashville, TN with terminals and facilities throughout the United States. Our company was founded in 1991 by Wayne and Donna Wise. After the passing of Wayne Wise in 2010, the future of the company was placed in the hands of the existing management team. In 2019, Western Express was able to provide the opportunity for the Wise family to redeem most of their shares. They will maintain a minority shareholder position. The current management team now owns the majority interest.Western Express has grown to become a large tier industry truckload carrier running one of the newest fleets in the industry.  Our fleet of over 3000 power units and over 7500 trailers are 100% GPS trackable.  We are a service focused company.

CALL TO SPEAK WITH A SEATING SPECIALIST TODAY!

Western Express is now hiring company truck drivers, trainees, and driver trainers. Whether you’re an experienced driver or you’re just starting your career, Western Express is the place for you. With our new pay plan, you’ll earn one of the highest rates in the industry.

We Offer:

  • Top Pay – Earn up to $120,000+/year!
  • Up to $0.54 per mile plus bonuses (no sliding pay scale!)
  • High trainee pay + aggressive pay increases in first 6 months
  • 60-80% drop and hook keeps you moving
  • Regional fleets available with minimum guarantees and high paying bonus miles
  • Great solo positions with consistent miles and home time
  • Newest Trucks: average 1.5 years old
  • OTR and regional positions available
  • $1,000 driver referral bonus
  • Tuition Reimbursement up to $6,000 for recent grads
  • Pet & Rider policy
  • Trainees earn experienced driver pay once training is complete
  • Excellent Benefits: Health, Dental and Vision, and 401k
  • Paid Vacation
  • Free WiFi at all partner truck stops
  • New driver mobile app makes your job easier – streamlines communication, simplifies job tasks, and more!

Requirements:

  • Valid CDL-A (no experience required)
  • 21 Years of Age or Older

INTERESTED IN BEING A DRIVER TRAINER? Drive for us for 3 months or more and you will qualify as a driver trainer at Western Express! Call today for more details on how you can earn up to $120,000 annually!

Have you been out of driving for 3 years or more? Are you a recent CDL-A grad? Call us for information about our Training Programs today!

    or call (877) 887-5027

    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Lease-Purchase Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how being a Lease-Purchase driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is a Lease-Purchase Driver?

    Lease-Purchase drivers (LPDs) are drivers who often have experience driving for a carrier or company but are interested in taking a step toward greater independence and eventually taking outright ownership of their equipment. Lease Purchase drivers have more control over work hours, jobs accepted, and routes driven than Company Drivers, but not as much control as Owner-Operators.

    Carriers frequently offer lease purchase options to drivers. Under a Lease-Purchase arrangement, the carrier likely owns the truck but enters into an agreement with the driver in which the truck is leased to the driver for a fixed or variable fee (as specified in the least agreement). The driver pays the leasing fee, a portion of which goes to pay down the “principal” and a portion goes to an agreed upon interest rate. If the driver remains with the lease long enough, the full original value of the truck will be paid off, and the driver assumes ownership of the truck.

    A driver exploring lease-purchase arrangement should research various carriers or company-specific information. They should compare the pros and cons of each, look closely at those that appear to best match their level of acceptable risk, their abilities to operate a business, their forecasted expenses, and their lifestyle.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Lease-Purchase Drivers?

    Lease-Purchase drivers will find that a blend of traits needed of Company Drivers and Owner Operators will serve them well as they take a step toward self-employment. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, lease-purchase drivers are also faced with the need for business savvy, accounting and bookkeeping knowledge, experience with taxes, and an ability to remain up to date with current and forecast trends in the freight transport industries.

    For additional information about Lease-Purchase Drivers, including what is a Lease-Purchase Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Lease-Purchase Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Owner Operators

    The information below provides insight into how working as an Owner Operator (also referred to as an Independent Contractor) may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is an Owner Operator?

    At its most basic level, an owner-operator (OO) is exactly as it sounds — a driver who owns the truck he or she operates as an independent business. For many truck drivers, becoming an OO means you have reached the pinnacle of the truck driving industry. You own, or have financed, the costs of your own truck in your own name. You decide who you will contract with, when you will contract, where you will drive, and the cargo you are willing to carry.

    An OO is a "free and clear" small business owner. Likewise, those searching for freight shipment often prefer to deal with OOs and will pay more when the opportunity is exists. The fact that an OO, by definition, means the truck's owner and driver are one in the same removes the financial burden of a carrier or company hiring, training and maintaining extra drivers when demand sinks to normal or below normal levels.

    What personal characteristics best serve Owner Operators?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, an OO needs to have the knowledge and ability to operate within the industry and maintain mutually-beneficial relationships with clients. These client relationships must be developed to a level beyond that of any other type of driver. As an OO, you have reached the top of the heap when it comes to truck driving. There are no shortcuts, and through experience, you need to know how to react in virtually all situations ranging from personal interactions to truck repairs to working with your accountant if you are subject to an audit.

    For additional information about Owner Operators, including what is a Owner Operator, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Owner Operators, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Team Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Team Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is a Team Driver?

    A team driver is a driver operating with a partner who shares driving duties and other tasks with the other partner. Delivery is much faster than utilizing a single driver, as Hours of Service regulations can be met for one driver while the other is resting. Team drivers often consist of spouses driving together or partners in an owner-operator situation. Likewise, an owner-operator may hire on another driver for the sole purpose of serving as part of a two-man team.

    In some cases, a team can be formed by two individuals who may own a truck together or when one works for the other driver. But more frequently team drivers are the result of carrier or company programs that pair up drivers to provide the benefits a team arrangement offers. Of course, these teams must be carefully selected and monitored. People do not get along for a variety of reasons. A team that gets along well, communicates, and has similar goals and expectations of the job is going to be far more efficient and productive than a team that does not like driving together.

    What personal characteristics are need for Team Drivers?

    There is nothing as important to team driving as the personal relationships built between the partners. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Team Driver must be able to work day-in and day-out with a partner. You’ll likely recognize that a team driving arrangement complicates and trumps any other issue you may run into in terms of personal characteristics.

    For additional information about Team Drivers, including what is a Team Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Team Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is Dry Van hauling?

    Dry vans are likely the most basic type of trailer in the industry and the type beginning drivers are likely haul upon gaining their first jobs. A dry van is normally a 53-foot box-like trailers loaded with non-perishable good (think of the historical term of “dry goods store,” and the type of products they sold).

    What are requirements necessary to haul dry van equipment?

    Typically, dry vans can be hauled by anyone holding the appropriate classification of CDL.

    What endorsements are need for dry van hauling?

    If the cargo is considered hazardous or includes hazardous materials, an (H), Hazardous Materials, or (X), Hazardous Materials/Tanker endorsement is needed.

    For more information about Dry Van Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is flatbed hauling equipment?

    Flatbed trailers are essentially exactly what the name implies — a base of steel or similar material mounted on a frame with axles and wheels. Flat beds often haul oversized load that cannot fit in an enclosed trailer.

    What are driver requirements for hauling flatbed equipment?

    Aside from the appropriate CDL, drivers of flatbed equipment need to be adept at securing cargo with tarps, “come-a-longs,” chains, strapping, or other types of devices. Before leaving the location of loading, drivers must make sure the cargo is securely held on the trailer and unable to move in any direction during events up to and including collisions, jackknifing, or to the extent possible, rollovers. Securing cargo on flatbed trailers is not a one-time check-and-go responsibility and must be rechecked and adjusted as needed.

    Another important point of flatbed hauling concerns oversized loads. If cargo is wider or taller than a trailer would otherwise carry, the trailer must include large notations indicating “Oversized Load.” In some cases, oversized loads will be accompanied by pilot vehicles who alert the truck drivers of potentially dangerous barriers ahead and often pull into the left lane to prevent other vehicles from passing until safe.

    What endorsements are needed for flatbed hauling?

    Endorsements for flatbed hauling depend on the type of cargo secured to the trailer. In cases where hazardous materials are being hauled, an (H) or (X) endorsement is needed. Also, if a tank of liquid, hazardous or not, is placed on a flatbed, for hauling purposes the trailer becomes a tanker. In such cases, it is best to hold endorsements for (N) Tankers, (H) Hazardous Materials, and/or (X) Hazardous Materials/Tanker combinations.

    For more information about Flatbed Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Dedicated Routes are most often assigned to specific drivers who drive the specifically assigned routes and no others. Dedicated route drivers are often regional or local and have more opportunities for home time. They are also frequently reserved for drivers who may find OTR routes more difficult.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Local Routes are shorter and cover a smaller (usually local) geographic area. Local Route drivers are home every night and have a regular daily route including several stops to offload cargo. Companies servicing restaurants, grocery stores, convenience stores, and high-volume retail outlets are frequently included in a local route on a daily or semi-regular basis.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.