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Class A CDL – Local, Regional & OTR Company Drivers in Branson, MO

$2,500 Sign-On Bonus
Affton Trucking

Class A CDL – Local, Regional & OTR Company Drivers in Branson, MO

You're not a number with us but a member of the family

Now offering a $2,500 Sign On Bonus

 

Affton Trucking was established in 1969 by Floyd Wright and remained a family owned business until January 2019. Dana Transport, based out of Avenal, NJ purchased the company and we became Affton Transport, LLC. One thing that has always remained a constant, then and now, is that the company cares about its people! Providing a safe, clean, professional environment for the employees and contractors. Our employee turn-over rate is very low and we have many drivers and office staff that have been with us for many years.

Our main facility is 125 acres in North St. Louis where we provide many different services for the transportation Industry. Trucking local and OTR intermodal containers, pneumatic tanks, ISO tanks and low-boy flat beds. We also provide warehouse and packaging facilities serving the resin plastic industry. Grain Transloading and container depot services are also a big part of our operation.

 

Pay & Benefits

  •  Local: $900 – $1,200/week. Home Every Night.
  •  Regional: $1,100 – $1,400/week
  •  OTR: $1,200 – $1,600/ week. Plus $50 per night out per diem (tax free)
  •  $2,500 Sign-On Bonus
  •  Health, Dental & Vision Benefits
  •  Paid Holidays & Vacation
  •  Company-match 401K Retirement Plan
  •  Assigned Trucks
  •  Family Oriented Environment
  •  Quarterly Safety Bonuses
  •  Reimbursements for Endorsements

 

Requirements

  • CDL-A
  • 24 years old minimum
  • Two years OTR experience
  • Hazmat & Tanker Preferred but not Required

In addition to the job benefits mentioned above, there are several other general advantages to truck driving jobs in Branson. Missouri is centrally located in the US and is a major cross-country thoroughfare to and from the eastern and western parts of the US. Missouri’s eastern border is the Mississippi River, therefore river ports are plentiful which expands even further the product options for truck drivers to haul.


Affton Trucking
You're not a number with us but a member of the family
Affton Trucking was established in 1969 by Floyd Wright and remained a family owned business until January 2019. Dana Transport, based out of Avenal, NJ purchased the company and we became Affton Transport, LLC.
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Additional Job Resources about this job

Company Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is Company Driver?

Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is Bulk Cargo Hauling Equipment?

Bulk Cargo is a specific commodity hauled using various types of trailers and is delivered to a customer for use in a specific industry. In other cases, the bulk cargo is hauled from a producer to market. Bulk cargo includes grain, soybeans, corn, and other agriculture products; various liquids; coal, propane, gasoline, and other fuels; wood products like pulp wood and mulch; construction products such as sand and gravel; and recyclable materials.

What are the requirements of a bulk cargo driver?

A driver should be thoroughly familiar with the type of trailer the materials is hauled in and how to operate offloading features. The various types of trailers will also cause a truck to handle differently, so a driver needs to be especially safety-conscious and alert when learning aerodynamics, braking, and other aspects required of various trailer types.

What endorsements do I need to haul bulk materials?

As with all truck drivers, those hauling bulk materials must hold the appropriate CDL for the type of vehicle being driven (Class A, B, and/or C). Likewise, as the materials and trailer types a driver hauls will likely vary, it is advisable that those expecting to haul bulk materials obtain endorsements including (H), Hazardous Materials, and (N) Tanker. In some states, drivers may be able to receive the (X) endorsement, a combination endorsement allowing them to haul Hazardous Materials in a Tanker-type trailer.

For more information about Bulk Cargo Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is flatbed hauling equipment?

Flatbed trailers are essentially exactly what the name implies — a base of steel or similar material mounted on a frame with axles and wheels. Flat beds often haul oversized load that cannot fit in an enclosed trailer.

What are driver requirements for hauling flatbed equipment?

Aside from the appropriate CDL, drivers of flatbed equipment need to be adept at securing cargo with tarps, “come-a-longs,” chains, strapping, or other types of devices. Before leaving the location of loading, drivers must make sure the cargo is securely held on the trailer and unable to move in any direction during events up to and including collisions, jackknifing, or to the extent possible, rollovers. Securing cargo on flatbed trailers is not a one-time check-and-go responsibility and must be rechecked and adjusted as needed.

Another important point of flatbed hauling concerns oversized loads. If cargo is wider or taller than a trailer would otherwise carry, the trailer must include large notations indicating “Oversized Load.” In some cases, oversized loads will be accompanied by pilot vehicles who alert the truck drivers of potentially dangerous barriers ahead and often pull into the left lane to prevent other vehicles from passing until safe.

What endorsements are needed for flatbed hauling?

Endorsements for flatbed hauling depend on the type of cargo secured to the trailer. In cases where hazardous materials are being hauled, an (H) or (X) endorsement is needed. Also, if a tank of liquid, hazardous or not, is placed on a flatbed, for hauling purposes the trailer becomes a tanker. In such cases, it is best to hold endorsements for (N) Tankers, (H) Hazardous Materials, and/or (X) Hazardous Materials/Tanker combinations.

For more information about Flatbed Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is intermodal hauling?

Intermodal hauling is normally applied to drivers hauling cargo that will reach its destination using more than one type of transportation method. While some consider truck routes covering interstates and city streets to be intermodal, the term is more often used when trucks carry cargo to and from clients for just a portion of the cargo’s journey. Railways, shipping along rivers or coastlines, overseas shipping using cargo ships, and shipping via airline may make up other portions of the cargo’s route from supplier to its end destination. Often Intermodal hauling involves international shipments, and the companies coordinate surcharges, tariffs, and other aspects of trade agreements and customs regulations to avoid cargo being held up along its route.

What characteristics are needed of intermodal truck drivers?

Patience. When arriving at a loading terminal, or especially at the off-loading location, long lines of trucks will be awaiting their opportunity to off load their cargo. While forklifts may be used for smaller cargo, in other cases the box of the trailer will be lifted from its axles by crane or the entire trailer, axles and wheels included will be lifted.

Other attributes of intermodal drivers include a willingness to travel a variety of local, regional, and/or OTR routes; ability to drive 1,200-4,000 miles weekly; the ability to be a team player and accept that the truck driver is but one role of many in a closely coordinated process; ability to control climate conditions inside a trailer to avoid cargo from getting too hot, cold, wet, dry, or otherwise improper for the cargo.

What endorsements are needed to haul intermodal freight?

A CDL is required of all intermodal freight drivers. Endorsements are depending on the type of cargo being hauled and might include (H) Hazardous Materials, (N) Tanker, or (X) Combination Hazardous Materials and Tanker.

For more information about Intermodal Freight Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is a tanker/fuel transport driver?

Tanker equipment is designed for hauling various types of liquids and gases ranging from water to gasoline to hydrogen or other chemicals. Tankers include trailer used exclusively for the purpose of hauling liquids and flatbed trailers with tanks secured to the trailer.

What characteristics does a tanker driver need?

A tanker driver must accept an extremely high level of responsibility and exercise equally extreme caution when hauling and offloading liquids or gases. Some chemical hauled in tankers can be environmentally-hazardous if released, and other may be deadly — sometime for a considerable distance and requiring evacuations of neighborhoods or business districts. The liability a driver and employer hold when hauling and offloading hazardous materials requires high levels of insurance as well as high premiums. Tanker drivers are not going to be hired if inexperienced or with records of questionable driving behavior.

Tanker drivers must also be detailed in record-keeping. Reading gauges as materials is loaded, hauled, and offloading is important to know how much of a tank’s capacity is delivered to what locations and if gauges indicate leaks. Hazardous material transportation laws can be strict.

What endorsements do tanker drivers need?

Tanker drivers are required to hold the (N) Tanker endorsement, and it is advised to obtain the (H) Hazardous Materials endorsement or (X) Hazardous Material-Tanker combination endorsement. With the endorsement tanker drivers will be limited in the liquids they can haul.

For more information about Tanker Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources

Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Endorsement: the (H) endorsement. This endorsement is required if you are transporting hazardous materials such as flammable liquids, combustible liquids, gases, and other explosive materials. The (H) endorsement is available and is required of all CDL holders transporting these materials, even at the Class C CDL level.

To earn and maintain the HazMat (H) endorsement, drivers must successful complete the following: (1) written knowledge test, (2) Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Security Threat Assessment application, (3) submit fingerprints along with two forms of ID (Driver’s license, DOT medical card, etc.) and (4) periodic written knowledge retest.

Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Hazardous Materials (HazMat) endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

Tanker Endorsement: (N) endorsement. This endorsement allows you to operate a tank vehicle. The endorsement is required for both vehicles designed with both permanently and temporarily attached tanks. Examples of tank vehicles are those used to transport liquids or liquid gas materials. The requirement to obtain the Tanker (N) endorsement is passing a written knowledge test.

Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Tanker endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Local Routes are shorter and cover a smaller (usually local) geographic area. Local Route drivers are home every night and have a regular daily route including several stops to offload cargo. Companies servicing restaurants, grocery stores, convenience stores, and high-volume retail outlets are frequently included in a local route on a daily or semi-regular basis.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.

Clark Transfer