TheTrucker.com

Solo or Team Truck Driver Jobs

OTR
Panther

SOLO & TEAM DRIVER OPPORTUNITIES

As an independent solo or team driver for Panther, you can start a rewarding career working directly with some of the most knowledgeable fleet owners in the industry – without the investment. It’s a great opportunity to grow your skill and learn the business while safely hauling no-touch expedite shipments across the country.

START A REWARDING CAREER

  • Put your miles to work with our Driver Rewards Program
  • No forced dispatch
  • Weekly settlements
  • 99% no-touch freight = more time on the road
  • Predictable home time
  • Access to a personalized, web-based driver support center
  • MEET THESE REQUIREMENTS

  • Class A CDL or higher for tractor
  • Class A or B CDL for straight truck
  • At least 6 months’ verifiable tractor-trailer experience*
  • At least 21 years of age
  • Verifiable, clean driving record and good work history
  • Pass physical exam and drug screen

  • * No CDL or experience required for driving cargo vans.
    ** All drivers are independent contractors of Panther and are paid by their owner.


    Panther
    Drive More. Earn More.

    The Panther network is one of the largest, most diverse ground fleets in the industry.

    More info about this Carrier

    or call (877) 897-9991

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    with Panther

    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is Dry Van hauling?

    Dry vans are likely the most basic type of trailer in the industry and the type beginning drivers are likely haul upon gaining their first jobs. A dry van is normally a 53-foot box-like trailers loaded with non-perishable good (think of the historical term of “dry goods store,” and the type of products they sold).

    What are requirements necessary to haul dry van equipment?

    Typically, dry vans can be hauled by anyone holding the appropriate classification of CDL.

    What endorsements are need for dry van hauling?

    If the cargo is considered hazardous or includes hazardous materials, an (H), Hazardous Materials, or (X), Hazardous Materials/Tanker endorsement is needed.

    For more information about Dry Van Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.