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CDL A Shuttle Drivers – Intermodal – $78,000 Annually – Home Daily

Hogan

CDL A Intermodal Shuttle Driver – Earn up to $0.69 CPM – Home Daily!

Earn Your Potential With An Additional* $10,000 Sign-On Bonus!

What you get:

  • $0.66-$0.69 CPM*
  • Home Daily
  • Average Annual Pay of $78,000
  • Monday thru Friday work week
  • No Touch Freight
  • APU Equipped Late-Model Trucks
  • Vacation and Holiday Pay
  • Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, 401(k)
  • Your Background & Experience:

  • Valid Class A CDL
  • TWIC, Tanker, and Hazmat endorsements required. Must be willing to immediately obtain endorsements upon hire – Hogan will reimburse you!
  • Know where your next mile is coming from with Hogan!

    What’s it like driving for Hogan? Think road trips, but you get paid and control the music.

    With over 100 years of experience, we understand what drivers need and want; dedicated routes, predictable home time and competitive pay. What keeps drivers with Hogan? Our family culture! You are more than an employee, you are the vital piece to our success. Join the Hogan family today and let’s go the distance together!

    Our promise to you is a trucking career driven by communication, honesty, and respect. Hogan welcomes anyone interested in an essential and sustainable career to join our team including recent CDL A graduates, Military Veterans, and Women. See where the road can take you when you drive for Hogan!

    *Speak to a recruiter today for more details!


    Hogan
    Our Success Depends on Our Team
    Hogan is one of the largest, fastest growing, and most respected transportation service providers in the US.
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    or call (877) 930-5577

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    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is intermodal hauling?

    Intermodal hauling is normally applied to drivers hauling cargo that will reach its destination using more than one type of transportation method. While some consider truck routes covering interstates and city streets to be intermodal, the term is more often used when trucks carry cargo to and from clients for just a portion of the cargo’s journey. Railways, shipping along rivers or coastlines, overseas shipping using cargo ships, and shipping via airline may make up other portions of the cargo’s route from supplier to its end destination. Often Intermodal hauling involves international shipments, and the companies coordinate surcharges, tariffs, and other aspects of trade agreements and customs regulations to avoid cargo being held up along its route.

    What characteristics are needed of intermodal truck drivers?

    Patience. When arriving at a loading terminal, or especially at the off-loading location, long lines of trucks will be awaiting their opportunity to off load their cargo. While forklifts may be used for smaller cargo, in other cases the box of the trailer will be lifted from its axles by crane or the entire trailer, axles and wheels included will be lifted.

    Other attributes of intermodal drivers include a willingness to travel a variety of local, regional, and/or OTR routes; ability to drive 1,200-4,000 miles weekly; the ability to be a team player and accept that the truck driver is but one role of many in a closely coordinated process; ability to control climate conditions inside a trailer to avoid cargo from getting too hot, cold, wet, dry, or otherwise improper for the cargo.

    What endorsements are needed to haul intermodal freight?

    A CDL is required of all intermodal freight drivers. Endorsements are depending on the type of cargo being hauled and might include (H) Hazardous Materials, (N) Tanker, or (X) Combination Hazardous Materials and Tanker.

    For more information about Intermodal Freight Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

    Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Endorsement: the (H) endorsement. This endorsement is required if you are transporting hazardous materials such as flammable liquids, combustible liquids, gases, and other explosive materials. The (H) endorsement is available and is required of all CDL holders transporting these materials, even at the Class C CDL level.

    To earn and maintain the HazMat (H) endorsement, drivers must successful complete the following: (1) written knowledge test, (2) Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Security Threat Assessment application, (3) submit fingerprints along with two forms of ID (Driver’s license, DOT medical card, etc.) and (4) periodic written knowledge retest.

    Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Hazardous Materials (HazMat) endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Dedicated Routes are most often assigned to specific drivers who drive the specifically assigned routes and no others. Dedicated route drivers are often regional or local and have more opportunities for home time. They are also frequently reserved for drivers who may find OTR routes more difficult.