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CDL-A Owner Operator Careers in Seattle, WA – Solos & Teams Welcome

No Forced Dispatch
Berger Allied Moving & Storage
Berger Allied Moving & Storage
As a one-source provider of transportation and storage needs, Berger has been delivering quality relocation services to individuals, corporations and government agencies since 1910. We specialize in the transportation of household goods, office and industrial equipment, special products and product distribution.
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Class A CDL Owner Operators

Hiring Solos & Teams in Seattle, WA

Solos, Earn up to $300,000 Running Your Own Business

Call Berger for more details at 888-626-6186

 

Owner Operator Solo and Team Opportunities Available for Household Goods

Do you want to be an owner-operator for a successful trucking company? Are you looking for opportunities from a company with a great track record and a long history of successful growth? Berger is financially strong and always looking to expand. We are currently looking for successful owner-operators to grow with us.

Berger has openings for regional/long-haul drivers in our household goods and new product distribution fleets. Join a company where our team cares about your success as much as you do.

If you are excited by the opportunity to drive for a growing, well-established transportation company, contact us! Berger is committed to safety, and requires you be at least 23 years of age with a clean driving record and no felonies.

Drivers Enjoy:

  • Owner Operators earn up to $300,000 annual
  • Also hiring Teams with HUGE earning potential
  • Hiring nationwide – we have 16 convenient terminal locations
  • Sign-on bonus as well as referral bonuses
  • No Forced Dispatch
  • Agent for Allied Van Lines in business for over 100 years
  • Fully equipped trailers
  • Limited truck leasing available
  • 24-hour emergency service
  • Pet/Passenger Programs – ask for details

 

Requirements:

  • CDL-A
  • One year minimum driving experience
  • Own Your Own Truck
  • Clean Driving Record
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Additional Job Resources about this job

Owner Operators

The information below provides insight into how working as an Owner Operator (also referred to as an Independent Contractor) may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is an Owner Operator?

At its most basic level, an owner-operator (OO) is exactly as it sounds — a driver who owns the truck he or she operates as an independent business. For many truck drivers, becoming an OO means you have reached the pinnacle of the truck driving industry. You own, or have financed, the costs of your own truck in your own name. You decide who you will contract with, when you will contract, where you will drive, and the cargo you are willing to carry.

An OO is a "free and clear" small business owner. Likewise, those searching for freight shipment often prefer to deal with OOs and will pay more when the opportunity is exists. The fact that an OO, by definition, means the truck's owner and driver are one in the same removes the financial burden of a carrier or company hiring, training and maintaining extra drivers when demand sinks to normal or below normal levels.

What personal characteristics best serve Owner Operators?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, an OO needs to have the knowledge and ability to operate within the industry and maintain mutually-beneficial relationships with clients. These client relationships must be developed to a level beyond that of any other type of driver. As an OO, you have reached the top of the heap when it comes to truck driving. There are no shortcuts, and through experience, you need to know how to react in virtually all situations ranging from personal interactions to truck repairs to working with your accountant if you are subject to an audit.

For additional information about Owner Operators, including what is a Owner Operator, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Owner Operators, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Team Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Team Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is a Team Driver?

A team driver is a driver operating with a partner who shares driving duties and other tasks with the other partner. Delivery is much faster than utilizing a single driver, as Hours of Service regulations can be met for one driver while the other is resting. Team drivers often consist of spouses driving together or partners in an owner-operator situation. Likewise, an owner-operator may hire on another driver for the sole purpose of serving as part of a two-man team.

In some cases, a team can be formed by two individuals who may own a truck together or when one works for the other driver. But more frequently team drivers are the result of carrier or company programs that pair up drivers to provide the benefits a team arrangement offers. Of course, these teams must be carefully selected and monitored. People do not get along for a variety of reasons. A team that gets along well, communicates, and has similar goals and expectations of the job is going to be far more efficient and productive than a team that does not like driving together.

What personal characteristics are need for Team Drivers?

There is nothing as important to team driving as the personal relationships built between the partners. Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Team Driver must be able to work day-in and day-out with a partner. You’ll likely recognize that a team driving arrangement complicates and trumps any other issue you may run into in terms of personal characteristics.

For additional information about Team Drivers, including what is a Team Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Team Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is household goods hauling?

When referring to household goods hauling, the term is not necessarily another way of describing “dry van” hauling, although the two have much in common. But “household goods” are those carried in “moving vans” or “moving trailers,” equipment often rented or contracted for people relocating substantial distances from their previous homes. For the purposes of this description, “household goods hauling” refers to the use of tractor-trailer combinations in moving personal belongings from one location to another.

What characteristics are needed to be a household goods driver?

A household goods driver needs to have all the characteristics of a driver of any type of equipment; however, patience, flexibility, friendliness, a willingness to answer question, and respect of both people and the cargo being hauled are magnified. When people hire owner operators to move their earthly possessions cross-country, chances are it is the first time they have had direct interactions with the trucking industry, so they may be very concerned about the delivery of goods and they will ask lots of questions.

What endorsements are needed for household goods haulers?

In most cases drivers in the moving industry are like dry-goods haulers. They typically don’t need any endorsements other than those provided to all CDL holders. Occasionally, some hazardous materials may be on board, in which case the (H) Hazardous Materials endorsement will be needed.

For more information about Household Goods Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Regional Routes are routes within a specified geographic region. The region may be as small as a few counties in a state, a state itself, or a number of states. Regions are often divided geographically in typical ways including the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest Northwest, etc.