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Flatbed Drivers-$1,700 Guaranteed Weekly Pay

Home Weekly
Decker Truck Line

Are you tired of not knowing what you are going to get paid? At Decker, you can earn $1700 guaranteed pay and be home weekly as a Flatbed Driver

Discover a more fulfilling driving career with Decker.

Decker Truck Line is a family-owned and operated company since 1931. We are Driven to Be the Best in all we do, and our drivers tell us they are having the best experience of their career. They feel respected as a professional driver and as a person. They identify the equipment as the best in the industry, and the staff as friendly, highly skilled and the best they have ever worked with. Decker is honored to be recognized by the trucking industry as a Top 20 2022 Best Fleets to Drive For.

“I’m just over three months here and I’m doing better than I ever have. Everyone in the office and shop is more than helpful and I have a great dispatcher.” zbax-driver

Great Pay:

  • Earn a minimum of $88,400 annual gross earnings
  • Earn a minimum of $1,700 guaranteed pay per week
  • Earn $.05 CPM monthly performance bonus
  • $5,000 accelerator sign on bonus paid quarterly
  • 2.5-day orientation with $500 orientation pay +$100 bonus potential
  • State-of-the-art equipment and Cab amenities:

  • Newer trucks from 2019 to 2023
  • APU and 1,800-watt inverter
  • Refrigerator and microwave
  • CB radio, free Wi-Fi and Satellite TV through Epic Vue
  • Top Benefits:

  • Home Weekly
  • Pet friendly – 1 dog up to 85lbs OR 2 small dogs that total 40lbs
  • Medical, Dental, Vision available the first month after 60 days
  • 401k with company match after six months
  • Required Experience:

  • Class A CDL and a minimum of 21 years of age
  • Recent CDL Class A graduates welcome
  • Drivers without flatbed experience provided flatbed driver training
  • Contact us today to find out why Decker is Driven to Be the Best.

    Drive4decker.com


    Decker Truck Line
    Driven to be the Best
    Decker Truck Line, Inc. has been a family-owned and operated company since 1931.
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    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is flatbed hauling equipment?

    Flatbed trailers are essentially exactly what the name implies — a base of steel or similar material mounted on a frame with axles and wheels. Flat beds often haul oversized load that cannot fit in an enclosed trailer.

    What are driver requirements for hauling flatbed equipment?

    Aside from the appropriate CDL, drivers of flatbed equipment need to be adept at securing cargo with tarps, “come-a-longs,” chains, strapping, or other types of devices. Before leaving the location of loading, drivers must make sure the cargo is securely held on the trailer and unable to move in any direction during events up to and including collisions, jackknifing, or to the extent possible, rollovers. Securing cargo on flatbed trailers is not a one-time check-and-go responsibility and must be rechecked and adjusted as needed.

    Another important point of flatbed hauling concerns oversized loads. If cargo is wider or taller than a trailer would otherwise carry, the trailer must include large notations indicating “Oversized Load.” In some cases, oversized loads will be accompanied by pilot vehicles who alert the truck drivers of potentially dangerous barriers ahead and often pull into the left lane to prevent other vehicles from passing until safe.

    What endorsements are needed for flatbed hauling?

    Endorsements for flatbed hauling depend on the type of cargo secured to the trailer. In cases where hazardous materials are being hauled, an (H) or (X) endorsement is needed. Also, if a tank of liquid, hazardous or not, is placed on a flatbed, for hauling purposes the trailer becomes a tanker. In such cases, it is best to hold endorsements for (N) Tankers, (H) Hazardous Materials, and/or (X) Hazardous Materials/Tanker combinations.

    For more information about Flatbed Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.