Connect with us

Uncategorized

Volvo Group North America ahead of schedule for energy efficiency goal

Published

on

GREENSBORO, N.C. — Volvo Group North America, manufacturers of Mack and Volvo trucks, is well on the way toward achieving its goal of reduced energy consumption in the Department of Energy (DOE) Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge.

The company met its first Better Plants goal — a 25 percent reduction in energy consumption at U.S. facilities — five years ahead of schedule and set a new goal of 25 percent more in savings by 2024. In the first three years of the new challenge, the Volvo Group is more than halfway to its target, reducing energy consumption by 14.4 percent compared with a 2014 baseline.

“We’re proud of the work we’ve done within the Volvo Group to improve our efficiency and reduce our impact on the environment,” said Rick Robinson, director  of health, safety and environment for Volvo Group North America. “As we shift from technical changes – which tend to have a large one-time impact – to operational and behavioral changes that are more people-driven, we see that commitment reflected in our employees. These creative and committed employees are really driving our progress toward our new goal.”

While structural upgrades such as LED lighting and modernized HVAC systems are playing a part, many of the energy saving ideas came from energy “treasure hunts” at Volvo Group facilities, Robinson said.

These are events in which employee teams observe their facilities during idle or partially idle periods (frequently Sunday) to identify energy waste.

Two such events conducted on two consecutive weekends in the fall of 2017 at the Volvo Trucks New River Valley plant in Dublin,Virginia, and the Mack Trucks Lehigh Valley Operations in Macungie, Pennsylvania, identified approximately $700,000 in low-cost or no-cost energy efficiency opportunities.

An additional treasure hunt at the South Plainfield, New Jersey, Prevost facility uncovered $12,000 in potential savings opportunities, which was equivalent to 34 percent of the utility expenditures.

Volvo Group North America’s progress in energy efficiency reflects efforts to reduce consumption at eight manufacturing facilities and six service centers in the United States:

  • Volvo Trucks, Dublin, Virginia
  • Volvo Group Powertrain, Hagerstown, Maryland
  • Mack Trucks, Macungie, Pennsylvania
  • Volvo Construction Equipment, Shippensburg, Pennsylvania
  • Volvo Penta, Lexington, Tennessee
  • Volvo Bus, Plattsburgh, New York
  • Volvo Group Remanufacturing, Charlotte, North Carolina
  • Volvo Group Remanufacturing, Middletown, Pennsylvania
  • Prevost Service Centers in Tennessee, New Jersey, Texas, California and Florida

Since DOE launched the Better Buildings, Better Plants program, nearly 200 partners have saved $4.2 billion and 830 trillion BTUs of energy.

For more on the Better Plants Challenge, visit https://betterbuildingsinitiative.energy.gov/better-plants/challenge.

The Better Buildings, Better Plants program is just one way in which the Volvo Group has worked with DOE to improve the efficiency of its facilities, Robinson said, adding that three of the company’s manufacturing sites — Lehigh Valley Operations, New River Valley and Hagerstown — are platinum-level partners in the DOE’s Superior Energy Performance program, the highest certification available in the United States.

“The DOE has been an excellent partner in helping us meet and exceed our goals,” Robinson said. “The resources and expertise they’ve made available have helped us save money and take a leading role in preserving our environment.”

 

 

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Uncategorized

Americans relocating to western, southern parts of country, United Van Lines survey shows

Published

on

ST. LOUIS — Americans are on the move, relocating to western and southern parts of the country.

The results of United Van Lines’ 42nd Annual National Movers Study, which tracks customers’ state-to-state migration patterns over the past year, revealed that more residents moved out of New Jersey than any other state in 2018, with 66.8 percent of New Jersey moves being outbound.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

CAPTION FOR PHOTO

Courtesy: UNITED VAN LINES

This map shows inbound and outbound patterns for the United States in 2018. The dark blue indicates high inbound moving rates, the light blue medium inbound moving rates, the gray shows balanced states, the light yellow medium outbound moving rates and the dark yellow high outbound moving rates.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The study also found that the state with the highest percentage of inbound migration was Vermont (72.6 percent), with 234 total moves. Oregon, which had 3,346 total moves, experienced the second highest percentage nationally, with 63.8 percent inbound moves.

States in the Mountain West and Pacific West regions, including Oregon, Idaho (62.4 percent), Nevada (61.8 percent), Washington (58.8 percent) and South Dakota (57 percent) continue to increase in popularity for inbound moves. In tune with this trend, Arizona (60.2 percent) joined the list of top 10 inbound states in 2018.

Several southern states also experienced high percentages of inbound migration, such as South Carolina (59.9 percent) and North Carolina (57 percent). United Van Lines determined the top reasons for moving south include job change (46.6 percent) and retirement (22.3 percent).

In the Northeast, however, an outbound moving trend continues. New Jersey (66.8 percent), Connecticut (62 percent) and New York (61.5 percent) were included among the top 10 outbound states for the fourth consecutive year. Midwestern states like Illinois (65.9 percent), Kansas (58.7 percent), Ohio (56.5 percent) and Iowa (55.5 percent) saw high outbound relocation as well.

“As the nation’s largest household goods mover, our study allows us to identify the most and least popular states for residential relocation throughout the country, year after year,” said Eily Cummings, director of corporate communications at United Van Lines. “These findings accurately reflect not only where Americans are moving to and from, but also the reasons why.”

The National Movers Study reveals the business data of inbound and outbound moves from 2018.

In addition to this study, United Van Lines also conducts a survey to find out more about the reasons behind these moves.

A leading motivation behind these migration patterns across all regions is a career change, as the survey showed approximately one out of every two people who moved in the past year moved for a new job or company transfer.

Other reasons for the high percentage of moves to the Mountain West in 2018 include retirement (28.1 percent), proximity to family (20.8 percent) and lifestyle change (19.4 percent).

Compared to all other states, Idaho saw the largest influx of new residents desiring a lifestyle change (25.95 percent), and more people flocked to New Mexico for retirement than any other state (42.74 percent).

“The data collected by United Van Lines aligns with longer-term migration patterns to southern and western states, trends driven by factors like job growth, lower costs of living, state budgetary challenges and more temperate climates,” said Michael Stoll, economist and professor in the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Unlike a few decades ago, retirees are leaving California, instead choosing other states in the Pacific West and Mountain West. We’re also seeing young professionals migrating to vibrant, metropolitan economies, like Washington, D.C. and Seattle.”

The top inbound states of 2018 were (1) Vermont, (2) Oregon, (3) Idaho, (4) Nevada. (5) Arizona, (6) South Carolina, (7) Washington, (8) North Carolina, (9) South Dakota and (10) District of Columbia.

The top outbound states for 2018 were (1) New Jersey, (2) Illinois, (3) Connecticut, (4) New York, (5) Kansas, (6) Ohio, (7) Massachusetts, (8) Iowa, (9) Montana and (10) Michigan.

New Jersey (66.8 percent), which has ranked in the top 10 for the past 10 years, moved up one spot on the outbound list to No. 1. New additions to the 2018 top outbound list include Iowa (55.5 percent), Montana (55 percent) and Michigan (55 percent).

Balanced

In several states, the number of residents moving inbound was approximately the same as the number moving outbound. Arkansas and Mississippi are among these “balanced states.”

Since 1977, United Van Lines has annually tracked migration patterns on a state-by-state basis. The 2018 study is based on household moves handled by United within the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. and ranks states based off the inbound and outbound percentages of total moves in each state. United classifies states as “high inbound” if 55 percent or more of the moves are going into a state, “high outbound” if 55 percent or more moves were coming out of a state or “balanced” if the difference between inbound and outbound is negligible.

To view the entire 2018 study and an interactive map, click here.

 

 

 

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

On-highway price of gallon of diesel drops another 2.9 cents

Published

on

WASHINGTON — The average on-highway price of a gallon of diesel dropped another 2.9 cents a gallon to $3.048 for the week ending December 31, according to the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy. It marked the 11th consecutive week the price has gone down. During the period the price has dropped a total of 34.6 cents a gallon from $3.394 a gallon.

Every region of the country posted a drop led by a 3.7 cents a gallon decline in the Midwest region and a 3.5 cents a gallon decline on the West Coast minus California.

The price is 7.5 cents a gallon higher than the comparable week one year ago.

For a complete list of prices by region, click here.

 

Continue Reading

Uncategorized

Trucker’s life made a little easier by tech like cell phones, on-board cameras, chargers, other gadgets

Published

on

Every once in a while, something crosses our desk that we need to pass along.

The Commercial Truck Trader’s mission is to bring everyone who needs commercial trucks to the dealers who sell and lease them. They believe in supporting small business and civic needs through search capabilities while delivering an easy visitor experience.

The company has compiled a list of eight essential gadgets for drivers to make their lives easier.

The list begins with a reality of which we are all too familiar.

Life as a truck driver is not easy. Even with a decent remuneration package being offered by companies, there’s still an ongoing shortage of drivers. The shortage of drivers is due, in part, to the hardships of life on the road, including isolation/loneliness and negative health impacts.

Fortunately, there are a lot of gadgets that can help make the trucking life better.

Comments are courtesy of Commercial Truck Trader.

  • GPS. For any driver, having a GPS can be a time-saver. While some still prefer looking at a paper map to determine their route, using a GPS can give drivers the fastest route possible and save a couple of hours by helping avoid traffic jams and road closures. Even experienced drivers who know their routes like the back of their hand can benefit from traffic updates that GPS technology can offer.
  • Electric blanket. Not all drivers have the luxury of sleeping in a hotel. Sometimes it’s a night in the cabin, parked outdoors where it’s possible to have freezing temperatures in the evenings. An electric blanket will heat up those cold nights to give a more comfortable and relaxing sleep.
  • Handpresso portable espresso-maker. Coffee is one of the best friends a truck driver will ever have. This drink helps them get through the long haul, where staying bright-eyed, focused, and safe is of utmost importance. With a portable espresso maker, drivers can enjoy a nice shot of espresso any time of the day.
  • Portable refrigerator and grill. Life on the road can be harsh on a driver’s health. Truck stops or roadside diners don’t always serve the healthiest of meals. Having a portable fridge helps drivers store healthy drinks and a grill to cook meals that are good for the body instead of going for the soda and burger option all the time.
  • Dash cams. Quickly becoming an essential for all professional drivers, dash cams record the road conditions and actions of drivers in cases of accidents. It’s not just to determine fault and liability, but data from dash cams can be used to improve driving habits and increase safety for the drivers, their cargo, and everyone else on the road.
  • Hand-held tire pressure monitor. Cross-country drives can be punishing to the tires, even more so when there’s a full load to carry. A hand-held tire pressure monitor allows a driver to check on tire health any time without having to look for the nearest truck stop or gas station. The best thing about this is that they can check the tire pressure without leaving the driver’s seat.
  • A smartphone. No matter what brand, a smartphone is another all-in-one gadget important to every truck driver. Aside from being the line of communication to the company, it’s also the line to family and loved ones. It provides access to the internet and entertainment, especially during stops that can tend to be lonely.
  • A power inverter. You can have all these cool gadgets, but they’d be pretty useless if they have no juice. Here’s where a power inverter can come in handy. This device acts like a wall socket and lets you plug in all your gadgets for power. This little thing can power or charge every gadget listed here and then some. Just plug your inverter into the cigarette lighter and you’re all set.

While life on the road isn’t always ideal, it doesn’t have to be boring and difficult. Thanks to these gadgets, living the trucking life is now more appealing because drivers can have a safer and easier ride ahead of them.

 

 

Continue Reading

Trending