CDL-A OTR Truck Drivers - Hittman is seeking the Best in Cleveland, OH

This job opportunity is open | Updated April 19, 2021 at 10:03 pm

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Hittman Transport Services
Hittman Transport Services
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Hittman Transport Services, a subsidiary of EnergySolutions, is the premier transporter of low-level radioactive waste in the country, and one of the largest trucking companies for hauling nuclear fuel in the United States. Qualified owner-operators must be in compliance with Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. Operators will be expected to secure loads to trailers, tarp loads when required, completes logs, reports and other required forms/paperwork.

Class A CDL Company Drivers 

OTR Runs – High paying flatbed freight

Join a Company Where it Pays to Stay in Cleveland, OH

 

Hittman Transport Services, a subsidiary of EnergySolutions, is the premier transporter of low-level radioactive waste in the country, and one of the largest trucking companies for hauling nuclear fuel in the United States. Qualified owner-operators must be in compliance with Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. Operators will be expected to secure loads to trailers, tarp loads when required, completes logs, reports and other required forms/paperwork.

 

Company Drivers Benefits

  •  Drivers Average $90K Annually
  •  **Strictly OTR runs**
  •  Medical, dental, life, 401K
  •  Paid Time Off earned
  •  9 paid holidays & 2 floating holidays
  •  Paid Training
  •  Dispatchers work hard to get drivers the amount of home time each individual prefers
  •  Direct Deposit
  •  Referral bonus
  •  2018 & newer Freightliner Cascadias
  •  2 assigned company dispatchers

 

Qualifications

  • 5 years OTR experience
  • HAZMAT & Tanker preferred
  • Doubles/Triples endorsement preferred
  • Knowledgable of tarp and securement procedures

    or call (855) 881-9266

    Additional Job Resources about this job

    Company Drivers

    The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

    What is Company Driver?

    Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

    What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

    Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

    For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is Dry Van hauling?

    Dry vans are likely the most basic type of trailer in the industry and the type beginning drivers are likely haul upon gaining their first jobs. A dry van is normally a 53-foot box-like trailers loaded with non-perishable good (think of the historical term of “dry goods store,” and the type of products they sold).

    What are requirements necessary to haul dry van equipment?

    Typically, dry vans can be hauled by anyone holding the appropriate classification of CDL.

    What endorsements are need for dry van hauling?

    If the cargo is considered hazardous or includes hazardous materials, an (H), Hazardous Materials, or (X), Hazardous Materials/Tanker endorsement is needed.

    For more information about Dry Van Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is flatbed hauling equipment?

    Flatbed trailers are essentially exactly what the name implies — a base of steel or similar material mounted on a frame with axles and wheels. Flat beds often haul oversized load that cannot fit in an enclosed trailer.

    What are driver requirements for hauling flatbed equipment?

    Aside from the appropriate CDL, drivers of flatbed equipment need to be adept at securing cargo with tarps, “come-a-longs,” chains, strapping, or other types of devices. Before leaving the location of loading, drivers must make sure the cargo is securely held on the trailer and unable to move in any direction during events up to and including collisions, jackknifing, or to the extent possible, rollovers. Securing cargo on flatbed trailers is not a one-time check-and-go responsibility and must be rechecked and adjusted as needed.

    Another important point of flatbed hauling concerns oversized loads. If cargo is wider or taller than a trailer would otherwise carry, the trailer must include large notations indicating “Oversized Load.” In some cases, oversized loads will be accompanied by pilot vehicles who alert the truck drivers of potentially dangerous barriers ahead and often pull into the left lane to prevent other vehicles from passing until safe.

    What endorsements are needed for flatbed hauling?

    Endorsements for flatbed hauling depend on the type of cargo secured to the trailer. In cases where hazardous materials are being hauled, an (H) or (X) endorsement is needed. Also, if a tank of liquid, hazardous or not, is placed on a flatbed, for hauling purposes the trailer becomes a tanker. In such cases, it is best to hold endorsements for (N) Tankers, (H) Hazardous Materials, and/or (X) Hazardous Materials/Tanker combinations.

    For more information about Flatbed Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

    What is a tanker/fuel transport driver?

    Tanker equipment is designed for hauling various types of liquids and gases ranging from water to gasoline to hydrogen or other chemicals. Tankers include trailer used exclusively for the purpose of hauling liquids and flatbed trailers with tanks secured to the trailer.

    What characteristics does a tanker driver need?

    A tanker driver must accept an extremely high level of responsibility and exercise equally extreme caution when hauling and offloading liquids or gases. Some chemical hauled in tankers can be environmentally-hazardous if released, and other may be deadly — sometime for a considerable distance and requiring evacuations of neighborhoods or business districts. The liability a driver and employer hold when hauling and offloading hazardous materials requires high levels of insurance as well as high premiums. Tanker drivers are not going to be hired if inexperienced or with records of questionable driving behavior.

    Tanker drivers must also be detailed in record-keeping. Reading gauges as materials is loaded, hauled, and offloading is important to know how much of a tank’s capacity is delivered to what locations and if gauges indicate leaks. Hazardous material transportation laws can be strict.

    What endorsements do tanker drivers need?

    Tanker drivers are required to hold the (N) Tanker endorsement, and it is advised to obtain the (H) Hazardous Materials endorsement or (X) Hazardous Material-Tanker combination endorsement. With the endorsement tanker drivers will be limited in the liquids they can haul.

    For more information about Tanker Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources

    Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

    Hazardous Materials (HazMat) Endorsement: the (H) endorsement. This endorsement is required if you are transporting hazardous materials such as flammable liquids, combustible liquids, gases, and other explosive materials. The (H) endorsement is available and is required of all CDL holders transporting these materials, even at the Class C CDL level.

    To earn and maintain the HazMat (H) endorsement, drivers must successful complete the following: (1) written knowledge test, (2) Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Security Threat Assessment application, (3) submit fingerprints along with two forms of ID (Driver’s license, DOT medical card, etc.) and (4) periodic written knowledge retest.

    Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Hazardous Materials (HazMat) endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

    Tanker Endorsement: (N) endorsement. This endorsement allows you to operate a tank vehicle. The endorsement is required for both vehicles designed with both permanently and temporarily attached tanks. Examples of tank vehicles are those used to transport liquids or liquid gas materials. The requirement to obtain the Tanker (N) endorsement is passing a written knowledge test.

    Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Tanker endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Endorsements are required “permissions” for CDL holders driving and hauling various types of equipment and freight. You can earn endorsements at the same time as your CDL, or you can apply for them after you have been driving for a while.

    Doubles/Triples Endorsement: (T) endorsement. This endorsement is for drivers hauling double or triple trailers. The requirement to obtain the Doubles/Triples (T) endorsement is passing a written knowledge test.

    Truck driving jobs requiring endorsements may offer opportunities for increased per mile, hourly, or route-specific compensation. Extra compensation based on endorsements will vary by the carrier. For more information about endorsements and what is required to obtain a Doubles/Triples endorsement, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

    Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

    Over the Road (OTR) Routes are likely those that most people with minimal knowledge of the trucking industry envision drivers working. OTR routes can be regional with occasional outside of region assignments or they may be cross-country to make one delivery or several along the way. OTR drivers are generally paid by the mile and are on the road for much of the year with limited home time.