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CDL-A Company Drivers in Charleston, WV – CFI Dedicated: up to 62cpm

Dedicated runs
CFI Dedicated
CFI Dedicated
Adventure on the Open Road
CFI’s truckload fleet has been a staple of shippers for more than 66 years. From our start with two trucks in Joplin, Missouri in 1951 to today’s 2,000 trucks and locations across North America, we have always prided ourselves on our reliable capacity and superior service.
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CDL-A Company Drivers in Charleston, WV

Dedicated Runs

Top mileage pay: up to $.62cpm / $1,300 weekly

 

CFI Dedicated is hiring professional dedicated CDL-A truck drivers. Various home time options include daily, weekly, biweekly and monthly. Majority of freight is drop and hook – 99% no touch.

Dedicated Driver Benefits

  •  Pay is account specific and varies from mileage based, hourly and salaried
  •  Top mileage-based pay as high as $0.62 CPM – on select accounts
  •  Top salary-based pay as high as $1,300/week – on select accounts
  •  Top hourly-based pay as high as $26.00/hour – on select accounts
  •  Hazmat pay – up to an additional $0.06 CPM for loaded Hazmat miles
  •  Paid orientation – $60/day. Plus, transportation, hotel room and 2 meals per day
  •  Veterans encouraged to apply – we recognize military service when determining pay
  •  New hire transition bonus for qualifying solo drivers
  •  Driver recruiting bonus program – up to $3,000 for each qualified driver referred
  •  Comprehensive benefits: Health, Life, Dental, Vision and 401(k) – plan includes company match
  •  Pet and passenger programs available on most accounts
  •  Safety value culture with a CSA score to prove it
  •  24/7 support, 365 days a year

 

Dedicated Driver Requirements

  • Class A CDL 21 years old
  • DOT Qualified
  • Must pass a comprehensive drug test
  • Satisfactory safety and employment history

Beyond the job benefits already listed above, there are several other advantages to truck driving jobs in Charleston. Iowa offers a variety of industries in which a truck driver can specialize. As you might imagine, agriculture tops the list. But whether exported out of state, out of the country, or simply remain in the state for the use of those living in Iowa, truck drivers are transporting large tractors, airplane parts, corn and several critical products.

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Company Drivers

The information below provides insight into how working as a Company Driver may meet your expected lifestyle, work into your long-term career plans, and provide the working environment you seek.

What is Company Driver?

Company Drivers are employed by specific companies that maintain its own fleet of trucks. Company Drivers are can be separated into 2 categories: (1) drivers working for trucking carriers that exist for the sole purpose of transporting freight of others, or (2) drivers working for companies that carry its own freight to support its own company’s product or service. Company drivers are in high demand, particular among large carriers.

What are some personal characteristics helpful for Company Drivers?

Aside from the personal characteristics needed to be a good truck driver, a Company Driver can be representing a company with thousands of workers in the US and internationally. Therefore, it is helpful for a Company Driver to keep a happy, helpful demeanor both to the general public and customers. Likewise, reliability, honesty, integrity, and self-motivation is necessary since you won’t have anyone looking over your shoulder or directing your every move. No one will tell you when to get out of bed in the morning or when to take a break or stop driving for the day (except the NMCSA, of course!).

For additional information about Company Drivers, including what is a Company Driver, pathways to securing a driving job, financial investment requirements, personal characteristics, average salaries and compensation structures of Company Drivers, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Different types of materials require different types of trailers, and each type of trailer offers drivers its own challenges. Therefore, it is important to understand what is required to not only drive your truck and your freight, but the trailer you are pulling as well.

What is Dry Van hauling?

Dry vans are likely the most basic type of trailer in the industry and the type beginning drivers are likely haul upon gaining their first jobs. A dry van is normally a 53-foot box-like trailers loaded with non-perishable good (think of the historical term of “dry goods store,” and the type of products they sold).

What are requirements necessary to haul dry van equipment?

Typically, dry vans can be hauled by anyone holding the appropriate classification of CDL.

What endorsements are need for dry van hauling?

If the cargo is considered hazardous or includes hazardous materials, an (H), Hazardous Materials, or (X), Hazardous Materials/Tanker endorsement is needed.

For more information about Dry Van Hauling, including what type of companies hire, job requirements, compensation structures, what endorsements are needed, visit Truck Driving Job Resources.

Truck driving route type vary within the industry and are dependent on several factors including interstate trucking requirements, route planning, type of cargo hauled, frequency, hazardous materials restrictions, driver experience, etc.

Dedicated Routes are most often assigned to specific drivers who drive the specifically assigned routes and no others. Dedicated route drivers are often regional or local and have more opportunities for home time. They are also frequently reserved for drivers who may find OTR routes more difficult.