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Professional truckers share Thanksgiving travel tips

Professional truckers share Thanksgiving travel tips
The American Trucking Associations is sharing Thanksgiving travel safety tips from professional drivers.

ARLINGTON, Va. – Nearly 53 million Americans are expected to travel over the road at least 50 miles or more this Thanksgiving holiday, the highest on record since 2005, according to the AAA auto club.

With that many people on the highways, the likelihood of accidents occurring increases. That’s why officials at the American Trucking Associations (ATA) said their Share the Road highway safety program is providing tips for safe driving ahead of the big holiday weekend.

“The high volume of travelers for Thanksgiving amplifies the importance of taking safe driving measures to ensure everyone can make it to the dinner table,” said Share the Road professional truck driver Earl Taylor of Penske Logistics. “Many families were unable to see family during the pandemic, and we want to be sure they get to their destinations safely.”

High traffic volume can contribute to congestion and a reduction in speeds.

“Share the Road’s award winning Instructional Video spreads truck safety messages to the millions of motorists who will be driving alongside large trucks this week,” according to an ATA news release. “The video, featuring professional truck drivers, gives an eight-minute recap of critical safe-driving habits and has already been viewed by hundreds of thousands of motorists, including truck drivers and the general motoring public.”

Click here to access the ATA’s safety video.

ATA Executive Vice President of Industry Affairs and Senior Advisor Elisabeth Barna said: “The professional truck drivers in the Share the Road Instructional Video are highly-trained drivers who have accrued millions of accident-free miles. Just taking a few minutes to review some of these important safety messages can make all the difference on the road.”

Thanksgiving offers several other driving challenges beyond traffic congestion, according to the ATA.

Winter driving presents unique problems for motorists, including high wind and blowing snow, which contribute to reduced visibility in many regions throughout North America. Similarly, freezing temperatures can have a profound impact on vehicles and roadways. A thorough pre-trip inspection and understanding of driving conditions can play a significant role in driving success this holiday season.

“As a veteran driver and a truck driver from Missouri, I have been trained to deal with wintery conditions on the road,” said Share the Road professional truck driver Steve Fields, of Yellow. “It’s important to make sure your vehicle is prepared for extended trips. Check your wiper fluids, antifreeze, and pack a few extra blankets before you pull out of the driveway in case of emergency.”

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Share the Road professional drivers recommend the following safety tips while on the road:

  • Buckle up: A seat belt will not prevent a collision, but it will save a life.
  • Remove ice and snow from your vehicle: Clear your windows and roof of snow to ensure you have maximum visibility and avoid creating a hazard for the vehicle behind you. Don’t allow ice and snow to create additional blind spots on your vehicle.
  • Slow down: Chances of a crash nearly triples when driving faster than surrounding traffic.
  • Do not drive impaired: Driving is a great responsibility and your fellow travelers are relying on safe, attentive drivers to respectfully share the road and make good decisions.
  • Be aware of truck blind spots: Trucks deliver your favorite Thanksgiving traditions – turkeys, cranberries, mashed potatoes and all kinds of tasty pies – so make it easy on them by staying out of blind spots. Pass on the left where the truck’s blind spot is much smaller.
  • Keep your eyes on the road: Distracted driving is a major cause of traffic accidents and one of the leading causes of death amongst teenagers. Even just two seconds of distraction time doubles the chances of an accident. Use your cell phone when stopped and never text while driving.
  • Do not cut in front of large trucks: Remember trucks are heavier and take longer to make a complete stop, so avoid cutting quickly in front of them. Fully loaded tractor-trailers can take the length of a football field plus both end zones to make a complete stop. Ask your favorite quarterback how far that is. Hint: it’s far.
  • Prepare your vehicle for long distance travel: Before you head out to your aunts, uncles and cousins, check your wipers and fluids and have your radiator and cooling system serviced. Simple maintenance before you leave your home can prevent many of the problems that strand motorists on the side of the road.
  • Prepare yourself for long distance travel: The vehicle needs maintenance and the driver needs plenty of rest and hydration to function at his or her best. If the turkey is making you feel drowsy, pull over and wait until you are more alert.
  • Leave early and avoid risks: Leave early to reduce anxiety about arriving late. Road conditions may change due to inclement weather or traffic congestion.
  • Be aware of the vehicle in front of you: Leave extra room between you and the vehicle ahead.
The Trucker News Staff

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content for not only TheTrucker.com, but also The Trucker Newspaper, which has been serving the trucking industry for more than 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News Staff aims to provide relevant, objective content pertaining to the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News Staff is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content for not only TheTrucker.com, but also The Trucker Newspaper, which has been serving the trucking industry for more than 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News Staff aims to provide relevant, objective content pertaining to the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News Staff is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.
For over 30 years, the objective of The Trucker editorial team has been to produce content focused on truck drivers that is relevant, objective and engaging. After reading this article, feel free to leave a comment about this article or the topics covered in this article for the author or the other readers to enjoy. Let them know what you think! We always enjoy hearing from our readers.

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