FMCSA declares Idaho trucker to be an imminent hazard after DUI charge

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Shane Warr booking photo
Shane Warr, an Idaho-based truck driver, has been declared an imminent hazard by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and may not operate a commercial motor vehicle until such time as he successfully completes the statutorily required return-to-duty process overseen by a substance abuse professional. (Booking photo from Bannock County, Idaho, Jail)

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Idaho-licensed commercial driver Shane R. Warr to be an imminent hazard to public safety and has ordered him not to operate any commercial motor vehicle in intrastate or interstate commerce. Warr was served the federal order Feb. 8.

On Feb. 3, Warr, a commercial driver’s license (CDL) holder, was operating a semi truck on Interstate 15 in Pocatello, Idaho, when it crossed over the median striking two passenger vehicles; the driver of one of the passenger vehicles was transported to the hospital.

Warr submitted to two breathalyzer tests conducted by Idaho State Police at the scene of the crash. Conducted minutes apart, the first test returned a breath alcohol concentration of 0.132; the second was 0.124. Operating a commercial vehicle requiring a CDL and possessing an alcohol concentration of greater than 0.04 is a violation of federal safety regulations.

Warr has been charged by the State of Idaho with the felony offense of driving under the influence of alcohol. He has also been charged with two misdemeanors — possession of an open container, and carrying a concealed weapon while under the influence of alcohol.

In August 2016, Warr was convicted in Idaho for driving under the influence of alcohol and had his license suspended for one year.

FMCSA’s imminent hazard out-of-service order states that Warr’s “blatant violations of the [federal safety regulations] and disregard for the safety of the motoring public … substantially increases the likelihood of serious injury or death to you and motoring public.”

Failing to comply with the provisions of the federal imminent hazard order may result in civil penalties of up to $2,500 for each violation. Knowing and/or willful violations may result in criminal penalties.

Warr may not operate a commercial motor vehicle until such time as he successfully completes the statutorily required return-to-duty process overseen by a substance abuse professional.

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