TheTrucker.com

New Mexico tosses 75 COVID-19 vaccine doses over temperature issues

Reading Time: < 1 minute
New Mexico tosses 75 COVID-19 vaccine doses over temperature issues
Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine must be held at about minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature-tracking device on a shipment of 75 doses to Clayton, New Mexico, showed that the vaccine became overheated during transport.

SANTA FE, N.M. — New Mexico has discarded a 75-dose shipment of the new COVID-19 vaccine this week after a digital device showed it overheated during transportation to a hospital, officials said.

The temperature-tracking device may have malfunctioned, but state officials threw out the vaccine doses to be safe, the Albuquerque Journal reported. The problem appeared to be isolated.

Pfizer had already delivered the doses to New Mexico, and temperature problems arose during transportation from a state Department of Health warehouse to Union County General Hospital in Clayton, New Mexico, about 280 miles (450 kilometers) northeast of Albuquerque.

Pfizer said the shipment to Clayton was “through redistribution channels not managed” by the company and that extensive tracking systems ensure no patient ever gets a “vaccine that may have been impacted while in transit during the delivery process.”

Matt Nerzig, a spokesman for New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, said the state made 18 vaccine shipments from a warehouse Tuesday, Dec. 15, and that only the one to Clayton had temperature issues.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines must be kept extremely cold and are shipped with dry ice at temperatures near minus 94 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70 degrees Celsius), officials said.

A new shipment was sent Wednesday, Dec. 16, to the hospital, officials said. The first batch of Pfizer vaccines in the state, more than 17,000 doses, is largely going to health care workers at risk of exposure to COVID-19.

The Associated Press Logo

The Associated Press is an independent global news organization dedicated to factual reporting. Founded in 1846, AP today remains the most trusted source of fast, accurate, unbiased news in all formats and the essential provider of the technology and services vital to the news business. The Trucker Media Group is subscriber of The Associated Press has been granted the license to use this content on TheTrucker.com and The Trucker newspaper in accordance with its Content License Agreement with The Associated Press.

Avatar for The Associated Press
The Associated Press is an independent global news organization dedicated to factual reporting. Founded in 1846, AP today remains the most trusted source of fast, accurate, unbiased news in all formats and the essential provider of the technology and services vital to the news business. The Trucker Media Group is subscriber of The Associated Press has been granted the license to use this content on TheTrucker.com and The Trucker newspaper in accordance with its Content License Agreement with The Associated Press.
For over 30 years, the objective of The Trucker editorial team has been to produce content focused on truck drivers that is relevant, objective and engaging. After reading this article, feel free to leave a comment about this article or the topics covered in this article for the author or the other readers to enjoy. Let them know what you think! We always enjoy hearing from our readers.

COMMENT ON THIS ARTICLE

Clark Transfer