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FMCSA declares Pennsylvania-licensed driver an imminent hazard to public safety

FMCSA declares Pennsylvania-licensed driver an imminent hazard to public safety
The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has declared Pennsylvania-licensed commercial vehicle driver Elwood M. Roberson to be an “imminent hazard” to public safety and ordered him to immediately cease operating any commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce. Roberson was served the federal order on April 25.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has declared Pennsylvania-licensed commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver Elwood M. Roberson to be an “imminent hazard” to public safety and ordered him to immediately cease operating any CMV in interstate commerce.

Roberson was served the federal order on April 25.

On Feb. 11, Roberson was operating a CMV to transport propane, a hazardous material, on River Road in Manor Township, Pennsylvania.

According to an FMCSA report, Roberson crossed the center line of the road and sideswiped an oncoming vehicle. Roberson was taken into custody and administered a blood alcohol test by the Manor Township Police Department.

Roberson’s blood alcohol content was 0.21, more than five times the 0.04 legal limit for CMV drivers.

Under FMCSA regulations, drivers with a commercial driver’s license are subject to a variety of prohibitions on use of alcohol prior to and while driving CMVs, including a prohibition on using any alcohol within four hours of driving and a prohibition on driving with an alcohol concentration of .04 or greater.

Roberson is now listed as prohibited in FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse and faces possible criminal charges in Pennsylvania.

FMCSA’s imminent hazard order states that Roberson “failed to exercise an appropriate duty of care to the motoring public while operating a CMV that was transporting propane, a hazardous material. Specifically, (he) ignored FMCSRs relating to alcohol use and the safe operation of a CMV. These violations and blatant disregard for the safety of the motoring public demonstrated by these actions substantially increases the likelihood of serious injury or death to [him] and the motoring public if not discontinued immediately.”

Failing to comply with the provisions of the federal imminent hazard order may result in civil penalties of up to $2,072. Knowing and/or willful violations may result in criminal penalties.

A copy of the imminent hazard order issued to Roberson is available here.

The Trucker News Staff

The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content for not only TheTrucker.com, but also The Trucker Newspaper, which has been serving the trucking industry for more than 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News Staff aims to provide relevant, objective content pertaining to the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News Staff is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.

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The Trucker News Staff produces engaging content for not only TheTrucker.com, but also The Trucker Newspaper, which has been serving the trucking industry for more than 30 years. With a focus on drivers, the Trucker News Staff aims to provide relevant, objective content pertaining to the trucking segment of the transportation industry. The Trucker News Staff is based in Little Rock, Arkansas.
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FMCSA declares Pennsylvania-licensed driver an imminent hazard to public safety

Comment

Its sad to see a professional driver under influence. Better saying, its sadto see anyone giving it to alcohol, drugs, or even gluttony. I believe its ok to drink with friends, knowing when to stop and not operating any machinery, vehicles specially, drivers under influence are multiplying. 95% of drivers are under influence, specially marijuana: everywhere we go. The horrible smell of it is unbearable, and law enforcement officials wont do anything.
For us commercial drivers is very bad and unfair, because this new hair folicle test. One can test positive jusfor being exposed to smokers.. and that will cost drivers reputation and jobs, law makers should do something about it. Everywhere this stench, and increasingly rage, violence, threats, all over, where are the law enforcement officers? They will enforce upon CDL holders for sure, like always, pursuing truck drivers brings more money to they vaults, no wonder why the drivers shortage, cdl holders under any influence, should be hold responsible for its account at most high charges, agreed, but being hold under influence under hair follicle test is unfair and criminal even.

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